Accreditation Compliance Institutional Effectiveness Report List

University Planning and Analysis:

Spring 2002 Self-Assessment Survey

Introduction

 

            In April 2002 UPA conducted its annual Self-Assessment Survey.  The survey asked respondents to assess the UPA web site in general as well as the various types of data and reports (i.e., student records, student surveys, faculty and staff reports, other miscellaneous reports) and planning and assessment information available on the site.  The survey also asked clients their satisfaction with ad hoc requests made of UPA.  Finally, respondents were asked to comment on how UPA could improve its services and to describe any future needs they might have for UPA services.  A copy of the survey instrument is attached.

The sample consisted of a total of 322 potential UPA clients from the Chancellor’s and Provost’s offices, College and Department administrators, unit directors, and committee chairs.  The overall response rate was 36%, ranging from 22% for college administrators to 56% for directors (see Table 1).  Given the relatively low number in the population and the low response rate, the results need to be interpreted with caution, especially when looking at differences between the separate groups of respondents.

 

Table 1: Response Rate Information

Title Category

Population

Survey

RR

MOE

N

%

N

%

%

%

Chancellors

25

7.8%

9

7.4%

36.0%

+20.9

College Admin

37

11.5%

8

6.6%

21.6%

+27.2

Committee Chairs

32

9.9%

12

9.9%

37.5%

+17.7

Department Admin

187

58.1%

67

55.4%

35.8%

+7.7

Directors

23

7.1%

13

10.7%

56.5%

+18.2

Provosts

18

5.6%

6

5.0%

33.3%

+26.7

Subtotal

322

100.0%

115

95.0%

35.7%

+5.9

No Title

0

0.0%

6

5.0%

 

 

Total

322

100.0%

121

100.0%

 

 

 


Frequency of Visits to UPA Web Site

 

            About half of those responding to the survey said they had visited the UPA web site in the past year.  Most of those visiting the site did so only once or twice a month at most.  The biggest users, relatively speaking, appear to be from the provost’s office, college administrators, and unit directors.  Low users are from the chancellor’s office and department administrators.  Those not visiting the UPA web site are most likely to say that they don’t need the information on the site or that they are not aware of the site.

 

How often visited UPA Web site in last year

 

All

Chanc.

Col

Com. Chair

Dept

Dir

Prov

 

n=112

n=9

n=8

n=11

n=65

n=13

n=6

Used total

54%

22%

87%

64%

43%

77%

100%

   Once a week or more often

8%

.

37%

.

.

23%

50%

   One or two times a month

18%

.

25%

9%

15%

38%

33%

   Less than once a month

28%

22%

25%

55%

28%

15%

17%

Never Used total

46%

78%

12%

36%

57%

33%

0.0%

   Never: no need

20%

44%

12%

18%

23%

8%

.

   Never: get UPA data from print reports

3%

.

.

.

5%

.

.

   Never: get data from non-UPA sources

5%

11%

.

.

5%

15%

.

   Never: did not know about

15%

22%

.

18%

20%

.

.

   Never: other reason

3%

.

.

.

5%

.

.

 

Ratings of the UPA Web Site Overall (Tables 2 and 3)

 

            Those using the UPA web site gave positive ratings to various dimensions of it.  Highest ratings were given to the logical organization of the pages and speed (load time).  Although still rated positively by the majority of users, lower ratings were given to the attractiveness of the site and ease of finding information.

 

Table 2: UPA Web Site Overall (Mean Ratings)

 

N

Mean*

Logical organization of the pages

60

3.5

Format and organization of data tables

62

3.3

Viewability

61

3.4

Attractiveness

61

3.2

Speed (i.e., load time)

57

3.5

Download speed

49

3.4

*based on 4 point scale (‘4’=’excellent,’ ‘3’ = ‘good,’ ‘2’=’fair,’ ‘1’=’poor’

 

Table 3: Navigation of UPA Web Site (Mean Ratings)

 

N

Mean*

Ability to find information

60

3.2

Ability to extract information

48

3.3

*based on 4 point scale (‘4’=’Very Easy,’ ‘3’ = ‘Easy,’ ‘2’=’Somewhat Difficult,’ ‘1’=’Difficult’

 


Institutional Research Data and Reports (Tables 4 and 5)

 

            UPA web-site users from all administrative groups are most likely to report using enrollment reports (92% overall), followed by student survey reports (75% overall) (Table 4).  About two-thirds of all users report using credit hour reports (66%), degrees conferred reports (65%), and admissions reports (62%).

There are some suggestive differences between university offices’ use of UPA data and reports on the web, although given the low numbers of respondents these differences need to be interpreted with caution.  College administrators tend to be among the heaviest users of most reports, especially those on the “hidden” web pages.  Department administrators are relatively high users of the student records and student survey reports, but do not use the hidden web pages as much as might be expected.  Those in the provost office are the most likely to use the faculty and staff reports, and, along with committee chairs, the NCSU organizational chart.

 

Table 4: Use of Institutional Research Web pages, by title category

 

Percent using page (N using page)

 

All

Chanc.

Col

Com. Chair

Dept

Dir

Prov

Student Records:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Admissions reports

62%

(37)

33%

(1)

86%

(6)

50%

(3)

57%

(16)

70%

(7)

67%

(4)

Enrollment reports

92%

(56)

67%

(2)

100%

(7)

83%

(5)

90%

(26)

100%

(10)

100%

(6)

Credit Hours reports

66%

(37)

33%

(1)

86%

(6)

33%

(2)

73%

(19)

67%

(6)

60%

(3)

Degrees Conferred reports

65%

(39)

33%

(1)

86%

(6)

17%

(1)

86%

(24)

40%

(4)

50%

(3)

Student Progress reports

36%

(21)

33%

(1)

29%

(2)

.

46%

(13)

33%

(3)

33%

(2)

Student Survey reports

75%

(46)

.

86%

(6)

67%

(4)

79%

(23)

80%

(8)

83%

(5)

Faculty and Staff reports

43%

(26)

33%

(1)

43%

(3)

50%

(3)

43%

(12)

20%

(2)

83%

(5)

Other Reports:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funding Formula

29%

(17)

33%

(1)

43%

(3)

17%

(1)

25%

(7)

33%

(3)

33%

(2)

NCSU Organizational Chart

52%

(32)

33%

(1)

57%

(4)

83%

(5)

41%

(12)

50%

(5)

83%

(5)

"Hidden" Web pages:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Internal data

24%

(14)

.

71%

(5)

.

22%

(6)

11%

(1)

33%

(2)

Dept.-level survey data

37%

(22)

.

83%

(6)

17%

(1)

43%

(12)

20%

(2)

17%

(1)

Planning and Evaluation

18%

(10)

.

50%

(3)

.

15%

(4)

12%

(1)

33%

(2)

 


            Majorities of those accessing the various UPA reports give positive ratings to the intelligibility and timeliness of the reports (Table 5).  Admissions reports received the most consistently high ratings, getting a 3.4 average rating for both intelligibility and timeliness.  Enrollment reports also received an average rating of 3.4 for intelligibility.  Users gave relatively low intelligibility ratings to the funding formula (2.9) and student progress reports (3.0), and relatively low ratings to the timeliness of student survey reports (3.0) and department-level survey data on the hidden web site (3.0).

 

Table 5: Use, Intelligibility and Timeliness of Institutional Research Data and Reports (All Respondents)

 

Yes - Used

%

(N)

Intelligibility:

Mean*

(N)

Timeliness:

Mean*

(N)

Student Records:

 

 

 

   Admissions

62%

(47)

3.4

(40)

3.4

(40)

   Enrollment

92%

(56)

3.4

(58)

3.2

(54)

   Credit Hours

67%

(37)

3.2

(39)

3.2

(37)

   Degrees Conferred

67%

(39)

3.2

(38)

3.2

(36)

   Student Progress

36%

(21)

3.0

(21)

3.2

(19)

Student Survey Reports

75%

(46)

3.2

(50)

3.0

(48)

Faculty and Staff Reports

43%

(26)

3.2

(26)

3.3

(27)

Other Reports

 

 

 

   Funding formula

29%

(17)

2.9

(18)

3.2

(17)

   NCSU Organizational chart

52%

(32)

3.3

(31)

3.3

(27)

"Hidden" Web Pages:

 

 

 

   Internal Data

24%

(14)

3.3

(13)

3.2

(12)

   Department-level survey data

37%

(22)

3.2

(20)

3.0

(20)

   Planning and Evaluation

18%

(10)

3.2

(12)

3.1

(11)

*based on 4 point scale (‘4’=’excellent,’ ‘3’ = ‘good,’ ‘2’=’fair,’ ‘1’=’poor’)

 

            Respondents were asked to describe in their own words the relevance of student records, student survey, faculty and staff, and other miscellaneous reports or data to their unit’s needs, and their primary reason for using any such reports.  A total of 34 respondents commented on the relevance of student record reports and data (admissions, enrollment, credit hours, degrees conferred, and student progress).  The majority indicated that the reports are important to their unit (see attached).  Unit directors in particular point to the importance of the reports in providing them the information they need to perform their duties, such as in making budget projections, in planning for software purchases, and in determining needs for fire safety and campus police.  College and department administrators tend to use the data for planning and assessment activities.  Those few respondents indicating they did not use the student records data either said it was because they did not need it or, in rare cases, that they either could not find what they wanted or it was easier for them to get what they needed from other sources.

            Slightly fewer respondents (24) commented on the relevance and usefulness of student survey data and reports.  Most commented on their use of the student survey data for program review, assessment, and planning.  Several commented that the survey data does not provide the level of detail they need, although the department-level data they are seeking is in fact available on the web).  A few respondents also commented that there is too much survey data, making it difficult to find what they need.

            Only 11 respondents (representing all general offices except committee chairs) commented on the relevance and usefulness of the faculty and staff reports.  Those commenting vary in the extent to which they see the faculty and staff reports as relevant and useful to their particular unit.  Among the various uses of the faculty and staff reports are comparisons with peer institutions, monitoring affirmative action programs, and FTE load.

            Comments on the relevance and usefulness of the funding formula and NC State University organizational chart available on the UPA web site were offered by 15 respondents in a range of offices.  Relatively few of them, however, said either was especially relevant or useful to their unit.  Several commented that the organizational chart was a useful reference, while a few others used the funding formula for budget projections and research proposals.

            Respondents offered a range of comments on the UA hidden web pages.  Several respondents noted that once they understood how to access the hidden web pages they found the information very useful for things like planning and program assessment.

            Respondents were asked to indicate any reports they might find useful to have on the UPA web site that are not currently provided.  Some respondents noted that they get the additional information they need through ad hoc requests, and don’t necessarily see they need to have such specific information on the web.  Several, however did make specific suggestions for additional reports, including:


Planning and Assessment Information (Table 6)

 

            At least one-third of all UPA web-site users report using the various planning and assessment information areas asked about, with compact planning being the most heavily used (59%).  In general the intelligibility ratings for the planning and assessment information is somewhat lower than those given for other data and reports (see above).  Highest average intelligibility ratings were given to the enrollment planning information (3.3) and lowest ratings to information on accreditation (2.9).  The planning and assessment information is generally rated as at least “somewhat useful,” with ratings on the 3-point scale ranging from a high of 2.6 for compact planning information and information on assessing programs, to 2.3 for information about accreditation.

 

Table 6: Use, Intelligibility and Usefulness of Planning and Assessment Information (All Respondents)

 

Used

%

(N)

Intelligibility:

Mean*

(N)

Usefulness

Mean**

(N)

Strategic Planning

44%

(25)

3.1 (27)

2.4 (25)

Compact Planning

59%

(34)

3.1 (36)

2.6 (31)

Enrollment Planning

43%

(25)

3.3 (25)

2.4 (21)

Peers & Performance Measures

36%

(21)

3.0 (23)

2.4 (21)

Assessing Programs

35%

(19)

3.2 (18)

2.6 (17)

Accreditation

14%

(8)

2.9 (11)

2.3 (10)

*based on 4 point scale (‘4’=’excellent,’ ‘3’ = ‘good,’ ‘2’=’fair,’ ‘1’=’poor’)

** based on 3 point scale (‘3’=’very useful,’ ‘2’=’somewhat useful,’ ‘1’=’not at all useful’)

          
 
Respondents from a range of offices commented on how they have used the planning and assessment information available on the UPA web site.  Uses mentioned include:

No respondents mentioned any planning and assessment information not currently provided that they would like to see on the UPA web site.
Non-Routine Reports (Tables 7 and 8)

            Fewer than half of respondents (46%) indicated they had requested a non-routine report from UPA.  The provost office, college administrators, and unit directors were most likely to have requested a non-routine report.  Overall ratings for UPA’s responsiveness to such requests were positive (3.5 on a 4-point scale).  However, ratings vary by the office making an ad-hoc request, from an average of 4.0 from those in the provost and chancellor’s offices, to 3.1 from committee chairs.

            Thirty percent of survey respondents said they made an ad-hoc request in the past year for UPA data, analyses and/or interpretation not available on the web (Table 8).  Slightly fewer respondents made an ad-hoc request for planning (20%) or assessment and program review data or assistance (20%).  Fewer requests were made for survey development (12%) or external reporting (15%).  Regardless of the type of ad hoc request, however, those making such requests gave consistently high ratings to the intelligibility, timeliness, and format of the data delivered by UPA.

 

Table 7: Evaluation of UPA’s responsiveness for “Non-Routine” Reports, by Title

 

All

%

(N)

Chanc

%

(N)

Col

%

(N)

Com Chair

%

(N)

Dept

%

(N)

Dir

%

(N)

Prov

%

(N)

not used/

not rated*

54%

(44)

67%

(6)

25%

(2)

73%

(8)

64%

(42)

31%

(4)

17%

(1)

used

46%

(74)

33%

(3)

75%

(6)

27%

(3)

36%

(24)

69%

(9)

83%

(5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UPA Responsiveness**

3.5

4.0

3.8

3.1

3.3

3.4

4.0

* this includes respondents who either said they had not made a request for a non-routine report, or that they did not have an opinion.

** average rating among those requesting non-routine reports, based on 4 point scale (‘4’=’excellent,’ ‘3’ = ‘good,’ ‘2’=’fair,’ ‘1’=’poor’)

 

Table 8: Use, Intelligibility, Timeliness and Format of Information from "Non-routine" Requests (All Respondents)

Special Requests and Customized Analysis:

Used

%

Intelligibility

Mean*

(N)

Timeliness

Mean*

(N)

Format

Mean*

(N)

UPA data, analyses and/or interpretation not available on our Web site

30%

(33)

3.5

(29)

3.5

(28)

3.5

(29)

Planning

20%

(22)

3.5

(18)

3.6

(18)

3.5

(18)

Assessment and program review

20%

(22)

3.5

(19)

3.4

(19)

3.5

(19)

Survey development

12%

(13)

3.4

(9)

3.6

(10)

3.5

(10)

External reporting

15%

(17)

3.5

(16)

3.5

(16)

3.5

(16)

average rating among those requesting non-routine reports, based on 4 point scale (‘4’=’excellent,’ ‘3’ = ‘good,’ ‘2’=’fair,’ ‘1’=’poor’)

 

Improving UPA Services

            Almost half of respondents offered comments on how UPA can improve its services.  While several complimented UPA staff and services, the vast majority, representing all offices included in the survey, indicated that UPA needs to do a better job in letting the campus community know about the data and services it provides.  Other specific reports to include on the web site mentioned by respondents included:

Only two respondents offered specific criticisms of UPA’s responsiveness to specific requests, both indicating that limited staff time was apparently the reason.  Another respondent noted that it is difficult to find UPA from the university home page.

 

Future Needs

            Respondents were asked to comment on any new issues they anticipate coming up for which UPA might be able to provide information and/or assistance.  Many of those commenting offered fairly specific suggestions about data needed for assessment purposes, such as for:

Others commented on the need for