NC State University


GRADUATING SENIOR SURVEY
SPRING 1996

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GRADUATING SENIOR SURVEY
SPRING 1996

Executive Summary

This report presents a profile of the Spring 1996 graduating seniors at NC State. It is based on responses to a survey administered in March 1996 to all students who were planning to graduate in the spring 1996 semester. The obtained sample represents 51.7% of the spring 1996 graduating senior class. Results of Chi-Square tests revealed no significant differences from the total population of graduating seniors in the areas of gender, ethnicity, or college. Thus, the results may be regarded as broadly representative of the 1996 graduating class. However, significant differences by gender or ethnicity were found for some of the questions.

This summary is organized to reflect the contextual relevancy of the findings to NC State's recently adopted strategic plan. Therefore, goals of that plan to which findings of the survey are relevant appear as headers to the findings in various areas. The Summary of Findings section of this report (Section IV) presents a more detailed summary of results presented here.

Strategic Plan Goal #1: NC State will improve success and satisfaction of undergraduate and graduate students, staff, and faculty.

Plans After Graduation

Employment While Enrolled

Satisfaction Ratings

Students were asked to rate their satisfaction with 34 university academic experiences, student services, and campus-related activities.

Time to Degree Completion

Goals and Development

Other Issues

Strategic Plan Goal #6: NC State will expand multicultural and global awareness among the members of the university community, in its curricula, and through international partnerships.

Strategic Plan Goal #7: NC State will achieve a diverse student body, faculty and staff that better reflect contemporary society.

Campus Climate and Diversity Issues

Comparison of 1995 and 1996 Findings

NC State graduating seniors in 1995 and 1996 responded very similarly to many questions asked in both years. Half of each class responded that their primary goal or objective for attending NC State was to obtain a bachelor's degree as preparation for a career, with three-fourths of respondents expecting to fully accomplish their goal. Seniors in each class rated themselves similarly on personal development and perceived NC State contribution to their technical skills development, development of attitudes and values, and goals for undergraduate education.

Satisfaction with the computer labs/center services, opportunities for participation in co-curricular activities, and personal safety on campus increased significantly in 1996. The 1996 cohort indicated that the NC State campus was significantly less supportive of African-Americans than the 1995 respondents reported.

Over one-third of seniors in each class worked 21 hours a week or more while at NC State, with more than half stating this employment was at least somewhat related to their degree. As of the time of the surveys, fewer 1996 than 1995 seniors had secured employment after graduation. Of those who had already found jobs, most respondents in both classes indicated they would be employed in full-time, permanent jobs directly related to their degree.

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SECTION I

Introduction and Methodology

Purpose

The purpose of the 1996 Graduating Senior Survey was to gather current information on all seniors graduating in the spring of 1996 at NC State. The UNC Board of Governors requested that the University of North Carolina - General Administration obtain information from these students in order to more accurately portray the experiences of undergraduates at NC State. This report presents the results of this survey.

At NC State, individual academic departments as well as schools or colleges were given the opportunity to insert discipline-specific items such that distinct information about unit-level institutional effectiveness could be provided. The inclusion of these inserts offered academic units the chance to collect valuable information on student outcomes and student opinions. Results from the inserts are presented in separate reports to the specific colleges, schools, and/or departments.

Description of Sample

This report presents a profile of the Spring 1996 graduating seniors at NC State. The survey was administered in March 1996 to students who were planning to graduate (as of March) in the spring 1996 semester. Instruments were either mailed or handed out to each student by their department. In April, a follow-up was conducted by either a reminder memo to the departments or with a follow-up mailing.

Completed surveys were received from 1,087 of the 2,019 students registered to graduate. Of those who returned a survey, 44 students did not graduate. A total of 1,044 usable surveys were analyzed, representing 51.7% of the spring 1996 graduating senior class. Results of Chi-Square tests revealed no significant differences from the total population of graduating seniors in the areas of gender, ethnicity, or college at the 0.01 significance level (see Section II). Thus, the results may be regarded as broadly representative of the graduating class. A copy of the survey instrument appears in the Appendix.

Methodology

The data obtained from the 1996 Graduating Senior Survey were analyzed according to standard statistical methods and practices. Responses by students' gender and ethnicity were tested to determine if there were any significant differences in response according to gender or ethnic grouping. All questions with strictly categorical responses (questions 2 - 4, 9 - 10, and 19 - 41) were analyzed using Chi-Square tests, and all questions with numerically coded responses (questions 5 - 8 and 11 - 18) were analyzed using either T-tests or one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Duncan's multiple comparison procedure. For tests which report an exact p-value (Chi-Square, T-test), the exact p-value is specified in the body of the text preceding each table. Duncan's procedure does not report an exact p-value, so in this case the p-value is reported as less than or equal to the specified significance level of the test (in this case, alpha = 0.01). To make identification of significant results easier, the category of significant response as well as an approximate p-value (p < 0.01 or p < 0.001) will appear immediately below the corresponding table.

All frequency tables in this report were calculated omitting responses of "don't know/did not use" and "not applicable" (for appropriate questions) to portray the most accurate picture of students' attitudes and opinions. In the cases where more than 5.0% of all respondents were omitted, the text provides detailed information about the percentages for those questions. In all tables, the percentages given are the percent of category response for each column, with each column summing to 100.0% (plus or minus 0.1 % due to rounding error).

Outline of Report

Student Goal Achievement

Presents responses to questions dealing with students' primary goal or objective for attending NC State and to what extent that goal was realized (questions 3-4), and questions dealing with choosing to attend NC State and the major field of study (questions 40-41).

Campus Climate

This section reports graduating senior ratings of the perceived campus climate for different subpopulations of students, and also includes sections regarding campus atmosphere, course perspectives, faculty issues, and extracurricular activities (questions 13-15).

Student Personal Development

These questions provide information on students' current level of development of personal characteristics, as well as the extent to which they feel their college education has contributed to this level (questions 17-18).

Student Satisfaction

Presents overall responses to level of satisfaction with the quality of the NC State educational experience in areas such as field/program, curriculum, facilities, opportunities, and services. For services requiring interaction with university offices or units, responsiveness of university staff was also rated (questions 11-12).

Outcomes of General Education

These questions provide information on how NC State has contributed to the areas of growth needs, general growth, and college contribution to knowledge, skills, and personal development. (questions 2, 5-10, 16).

Time to Degree Completion

Presents responses to the question of time spent to acquire a degree, reasons for taking less than 15 hours per semester and, if applicable, reasons for taking more than 8 semesters to graduate (questions 19-24).

Employment and Internships at NC State

Describes information relating to work during the academic year while at NC State, including reasons why students needed to work and participation in the co-op program (questions 29-34).

Plans After Graduation

Presents responses dealing with plans following graduation. Includes further education plans and questions on the nature of employment following graduation, including information on educational requirements, relationship to academic major and salary range (questions 25-28 and 35-39).

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SECTION II

Demographics of 1996 Graduating Senior Class and Survey Respondents

This section presents the demographic breakdown of the 1996 Graduating Senior class, and of the survey respondents by gender, ethnicity, and academic unit. There were 2,065 seniors who graduated in May 1996. Of those 2,065, there were 2,019 seniors registered to graduate in March 1996, when the survey was first administered. The total number of usable surveys was 1,044. No significant differences by gender (Chi-square 0.18, df=1, p<0.01), ethnicity (Chi-square 0.74, df=2, p<0.01), or academic unit (Chi-square 4.59, df=8, p<0.01) were observed between the sample obtained (survey respondents) and the population of actual graduates.

Demographics by gender and ethnicity are listed in Table 1. The breakdown of the Graduating Senior class by gender was: 39.8% female and 60.2% male; and by ethnicity was: 88.0% white, 6.9% African American, and 5.0% other ethnic minorities. The breakdown of survey respondents by gender was: 41.9% female and 58.1% male; and by ethnicity was: 90.7% white, 5.9% African Americans, and 3.4% other ethnic minorities.

Table 1: Demographics of Graduating Senior Class and Survey Respondents
Graduating Senior Class
Survey Respondents
Ethnic Group
Female
Male
Total
Female
Male
Total
African-American
89
4.3%
54
2.6%
143
6.9%
42
4.0%
20
1.9%
62
5.9%
Other Ethnic Minorities
32
1.5%
73
3.5%
105
5.0%
11
1.1%
24
2.3%
35
3.4%
White
700
33.9%
1,117
54.1%
1,817
88.0%
380
36.6%
562
54.1%
942
90.7%
Total
821
39.8%
1,244
60.2%
2,065
100.0%
433
41.9%
606
58.1%
1,039
100.0%

Note: Numbers in Table 1 differ slightly from the overall sample size because of missing data on gender and ethnicity.

Classifications by academic unit are presented in Table 2. The nine academic units surveyed are as follows: College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, School of Design, College of Education and Psychology, College of Engineering, College of Forest Resources, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, College of Management, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and College of Textiles.

The largest percentage of graduating seniors were in the College of Engineering (26.4%), followed by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (18.3%).

Table 2: Classifications by Academic Unit
Graduating Senior Class
Survey Respondents
Agriculture and Life Sciences
377
18.3%
213
20.4%
Design
96
4.6%
47
4.5%
Education and Psychology
139
6.7%
68
6.5%
Engineering
545
26.4%
307
29.4%
Forest Resources
89
4.3%
66
6.3%
Humanities and Social Sciences
361
17.5%
146
14.0%
Management
123
6.0%
78
7.5%
Physical and Mathematical Sciences
124
6.0%
60
5.7%
Textiles
211
10.2%
59
5.7%
Total
2,065
100.0%
1,044
100.0%

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SECTION III

Report Findings

STUDENT GOAL ACHIEVEMENT

This section presents responses to questions dealing with achievement of student educational goals and objectives, as well as students' perceptions of the overall value of their NC State experience. The breakdown of student goals is as follows: 49.4% of graduating senior respondents indicated a primary goal of obtaining a bachelor's degree as preparation for a new career or profession; 29.9% listed obtaining a bachelor's degree as preparation for graduate or professional school as their primary objective; and 18.2% gave obtaining a bachelor's degree or certificate only as their primary goal (see Table 3). A larger percentage of males (52.5%) than females (45.1%) attended NC State to obtain a bachelor's degree as preparation for a new career or profession. Nearly three-fourths (74.2%) of graduating seniors felt they will have fully accomplished their primary goal or objective for attending NC State (see Table 4).

Table 3: Primary Goal/Objective for Attending NC State
Primary goal or objective for attending NC State (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Bachelor's degree or certificate only
18.2
16.0
19.4
8.1
19.1
5.9
Bachelor's degree as preparation for school
29.9
36.7
25.2
56.5
28.1
35.3
Bachelor's degree as preparation for career
49.4
45.1
52.5
30.6
50.5
52.9
Improve knowledge, skills, competencies required for job
1.4
1.2
1.7
1.6
1.4
2.9
Courses for personal interest
0.2
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.2
0.0
Other
0.9
0.4
1.2
3.2
0.6
2.9

Table 4: Accomplished Primary Goal/Objective
Extent will have accomplished primary goal (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Fully accomplished
74.2
73.4
74.8
67.2
75.2
60.0
Partially accomplished
25.2
26.1
24.5
31.1
24.3
37.1
Not accomplished
0.6
0.5
0.7
1.6
0.4
2.9

In addition to academic goal achievement, graduating seniors were asked two global questions regarding a retrospective evaluation of their choice of school and major field of study. Most senior respondents (87.7%) indicated they would choose NC State again, but the percentage of seniors indicating they would choose their major again was noticeably lower (78.3%). There were no significant differences by gender in either response area, but there were significant differences by ethnicity in respondent's choice of attending NC State again (p = 0.001) and choosing the same major again (p = 0.003). See Tables 5 and 6 for these frequencies.

Table 5: Attend NC State Again
Choose to attend NC State again (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Yes
87.7
87.7
87.6
75.0
88.9
77.1
No
12.3
12.3
12.4
25.0
11.1
22.9
Ethnicity: p < 0.001

Table 6: Choose Same Major Again
Choose same major field of study again (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Yes
78.3
76.0
79.8
61.0
79.5
73.5
No
21.7
24.0
20.2
39.0
20.5
26.5
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

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CAMPUS CLIMATE

This section reports graduating senior ratings of the perceived campus climate for different subpopulations of students, and also includes sections regarding campus atmosphere, course perspectives, faculty issues, and extracurricular activities.

For each question, significant differences in response by gender (T-tests) or ethnicity (ANOVA) are reported when found. At the end of each subsection, means and standard deviations are presented.

Subpopulations

Most respondents indicated the perception of campus climate for women as being mildly to strongly supportive (72.9%). No significant differences were observed for this question (see Table 7).

Table 7: Campus Climate for Women

Women (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
0.3
0.5
0.2
1.6
0.2
0.0
Mild Discrimination
4.8
7.0
3.3
6.5
4.9
0.0
Neutral
22.0
17.3
25.2
17.7
21.3
45.7
Mild Support
35.6
39.8
32.6
46.8
35.0
31.4
Strong Support
37.3
35.4
38.8
27.4
38.6
22.9

Table 8 indicates that the perceived campus climate for men was seen as being mildly to strongly supportive by 69.9% of the graduating senior respondents. Females indicated a significantly stronger perception of support for men on campus than did males, at the p = 0.0001 significance level. There were also significant differences by ethnicity, with African-American respondents reporting a significantly higher perception of support for men than did other ethnic minorities (p < 0.01).

Table 8: Campus Climate for Men

Men (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
0.6
0.0
1.0
0.0
0.7
0.0
Mild Discrimination
2.0
0.5
3.1
1.7
2.1
0.0
Neutral
27.5
21.9
31.4
8.3
28.1
45.7
Mild Support
22.0
17.5
25.0
25.0
21.7
22.9
Strong Support
47.9
60.1
39.5
65.0
47.4
31.4
Gender: p < 0.001 Ethnicity: p < 0.01

The campus climate for African-Americans (Table 9) was perceived by 66.0% of all respondents as being mildly or strongly supportive. Significant differences were observed between respondents of different ethnicities (p < 0.01), as follows: The greatest amount of support for African-Americans was seen by white respondents and respondents from other ethnic minorities, with 68.4% and 48.6% respectively seeing a mildly to strongly supportive campus environment for African-Americans at NC State. Only 41.9% of African-Americans saw the campus climate for themselves as being mildly to strongly supportive, whereas 40.4% perceived the climate as being mildly to strongly discriminatory.

Table 9: Campus Climate for African-Americans

African-Americans (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
1.2
1.7
0.9
8.1
0.8
0.0
Mild Discrimination
8.6
11.1
6.9
32.3
7.1
5.7
Neutral
24.2
21.2
26.2
17.7
23.8
45.7
Mild Support
27.5
28.9
26.4
30.6
27.3
25.7
Strong Support
38.5
37.0
39.7
11.3
41.1
22.9
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

In general, respondents reported that the campus climate for other ethnic minorities was either neutral (37.2%) or mildly to strongly supportive (55.2%). Significant differences were observed by ethnicity (p < 0.01), with African-American respondents seeing a significantly lower level of mild to strong support (28.8%) than either white respondents (57.0%) or respondents from other ethnic minorities (50.0%). These percentages are displayed below in Table 10.

Table 10: Campus Climate for Other Ethnic Minorities

Other Ethnic Minorities (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
0.6
1.0
0.3
5.1
0.2
2.9
Mild Discrimination
6.9
10.8
4.3
20.3
6.2
2.9
Neutral
37.2
34.4
39.3
45.8
36.5
44.1
Mild Support
28.2
27.1
28.7
20.3
28.5
29.4
Strong Support
27.0
26.6
27.3
8.5
28.5
20.6
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Similar to the campus climate for other ethnic minorities, Table 11 shows that graduating senior respondents perceived the campus climate for international students as either neutral (34.2%) or mildly to strongly supportive (60.6%). Significant differences were again observed by ethnicity (p < 0.01), with African-American respondents seeing a significantly lower level of mild to strong support (40.0%) than did white respondents (62.5%).

Table 11: Campus Climate for International Students

International Students (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
0.3
0.5
0.2
3.3
0.1
0.0
Mild Discrimination
4.9
7.2
3.3
15.0
4.2
5.7
Neutral
34.2
32.7
35.3
41.7
33.3
45.7
Mild Support
28.5
25.7
30.3
28.3
28.3
31.4
Strong Support
32.1
33.9
31.0
11.7
34.2
17.1
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Responses regarding the campus climate at NC State for disabled students are displayed in Table 12. In general, the climate was perceived as neutral (33.8%) to supportive (53.6%) across gender and ethnicity. Notably, however, 12.5% of respondents perceived the campus climate for disabled students as being mildly to strongly discriminatory. Differences in response by gender were found to be significant (p = 0.0006) with more female respondents (17.6%) than male respondents (9.0%) indicating mild to strong discrimination against disabled students.

Table 12: Campus Climate for Disabled Students

Disabled Students (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
1.9
3.5
0.9
3.3
1.9
0.0
Mild Discrimination
10.6
14.1
8.1
13.3
10.7
2.9
Neutral
33.8
32.7
34.6
40.0
32.8
48.6
Mild Support
28.2
27.5
28.7
30.0
28.2
25.7
Strong Support
25.4
22.2
27.7
13.3
26.4
22.9
Gender: p < 0.001

Respondents' assessment of the campus climate for gay and lesbian students is presented in Table 13. Overall, the climate was seen as either neutral (36.4%) or discriminatory (35.9%) for gay and lesbian students. No significant differences were observed for this question.

Table 13: Campus Climate for Gay and Lesbian Students

Gay and Lesbian Students (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Strong Discrimination
15.0
17.2
13.5
22.4
14.4
17.6
Mild Discrimination
20.9
24.1
18.9
19.0
21.3
17.6
Neutral
36.4
31.1
40.2
41.4
35.6
50.0
Mild Support
15.2
15.4
14.7
12.1
15.5
8.8
Strong Support
12.5
12.2
12.6
5.2
13.2
5.9

Table 14 contains mean ratings of support for the different subpopulations of students, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 5, where 5 = strong support, 4 = mild support, 3 = neutral, 2 = mild discrimination, and 1 = strong discrimination. Graduating seniors felt strongly that gay and lesbian students received notably less support than any other subgroup assessed.

Table 14: Campus Climate Means and Standard Deviations
Mean and Standard Deviation
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Men mean:
4.15
4.37
3.99
4.53
4.13
3.86
sd:
0.93
0.84
0.96
0.72
0.94
0.95
Women mean:
4.05
4.03
4.07
3.92
4.07
3.77
sd:
0.90
0.92
0.88
0.93
0.90
0.81
African- Americans mean:
3.94
3.88
3.97
3.05
4.01
3.65
sd:
1.04
1.08
1.01
1.19
1.00
0.91
International students mean:
3.87
3.85
3.88
3.30
3.92
3.60
sd:
0.93
0.99
0.89
0.98
0.92
0.85
Other ethnic minorities mean:
3.74
3.67
3.78
3.07
3.78
3.62
sd:
0.95
1.02
0.91
0.98
0.94
0.95
Disabled students mean:
3.65
3.51
3.74
3.37
3.66
3.68
sd:
1.03
1.09
0.98
0.99
1.04
0.87
Gay and lesbian students mean:
2.89
2.81
2.94
2.59
2.92
2.68
sd:
1.20
1.24
1.18
1.12
1.21
1.07

Atmosphere

When asked to rate their level of agreement with the statement "People here don't treat each other with enough respect," more than half of all respondents (60.6%) reported disagreeing at least somewhat with this statement (see Table 15). No significant differences were found by gender or ethnicity.

Table 15: Respectful Treatment of Others
People here don't treat each other with enough respect (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
16.4
17.8
15.2
8.1
16.9
14.3
Disagree Somewhat
44.2
42.4
45.4
32.3
44.9
45.7
Agree Somewhat
29.1
29.6
29.0
41.9
28.3
31.4
Agree Strongly
10.3
10.2
10.4
17.7
9.9
8.6

Almost three quarters (72.3%) of all graduating senior respondents reported disagreeing at least somewhat with the statement "There is a lot of campus racial conflict here" (see Table 16). Significant differences were found by ethnicity (p < 0.01), with African-American respondents perceiving significantly more campus racial conflict than both white respondents and respondents from other ethnic minorities.

Table 16: Campus Racial Conflict
There is a lot of campus racial conflict here (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
23.9
23.2
24.7
9.8
25.2
18.2
Disagree Somewhat
48.4
45.3
50.3
31.1
49.4
48.5
Agree Somewhat
22.5
27.0
19.4
45.9
20.8
30.3
Agree Strongly
5.1
4.5
5.6
13.1
4.7
3.0
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Table 17 contains ratings of respondents' perceived descriptiveness of the statement "NC State is genuinely committed to minority success." Only 10.8% of all respondents reported feeling that this statement was not descriptive of NC State. Significant differences were found by gender (p = 0.0009) and ethnicity (p < .01), with males and whites reporting the least agreement with this statement as compared to their counterparts.

Table 17: Commitment to Minority Success
NC State is genuinely committed to minority success (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
10.8
13.0
9.3
50.8
7.6
20.0
Somewhat Descriptive
61.7
65.1
59.4
39.3
63.0
71.4
Very Descriptive
27.5
21.9
31.2
9.8
29.4
8.6
Gender: p < 0.001; Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Regarding the statement "Most students are treated like 'numbers in a book'," only 27.2% of all respondents felt that this statement was not descriptive of NC State (see Table 18). One graduating senior from the College of Management stated "I felt as if the school wasn't that big because everyone was always friendly and helpful. I never felt lost or like 'just a number'." However, it should be noted that 72.8% of all respondents felt that this statement was at least somewhat descriptive. Significant differences were observed by gender (p = 0.0009), with more male respondents (76.6%) than female respondents (67.6%) reporting this statement as at least somewhat descriptive.

Table 18: Treatment of Students
Most students are treated like 'numbers in a book' (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
27.2
32.5
23.3
17.7
28.0
22.9
Somewhat Descriptive
51.9
49.8
53.5
53.2
51.2
68.6
Very Descriptive
20.9
17.8
23.1
29.0
20.8
8.6
Gender: p < 0.001

Table 19A contains the means and standard deviations for the first two Atmosphere questions, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 4, where 4 = agree strongly, 3 = agree somewhat, 2 = disagree somewhat, and 1 = disagree strongly.

Table 19A: Atmosphere Means and Standard Deviations

Atmosphere

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
People do not treat others with respect mean:
2.33
2.32
2.35
2.69
2.31
2.34
sd:
0.87
0.88
0.86
0.86
0.87
0.84
A lot of campus racial conflict exists mean:
2.09
2.13
2.06
2.62
2.05
2.18
sd:
0.81
0.82
0.81
0.84
0.80
0.77

Table 19B displays the means and standard deviations for the second two Atmosphere questions, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses for were on a scale of 1 to 3, where 3 = very descriptive, 2 = somewhat descriptive, and 1 = not descriptive.

Table 19B: Atmosphere Means and Standard Deviations

Atmosphere

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Commitment to minority successmean:
2.17
2.09
2.22
1.59
2.22
1.89
sd:
0.60
0.59
0.60
0.67
0.57
0.53
Students treated like numbers in a book mean:
1.94
1.85
2.00
2.11
1.93
1.86
sd:
0.69
0.69
0.68
0.68
0.69
0.55

Course Perspectives

Graduating senior respondents were asked to rate their level of agreement with the statement "Many courses include minority group perspectives." These ratings are shown in Table 20. Almost two thirds (62.4%) of all respondents reported agreeing at least somewhat with this statement. Significant differences in response were found by ethnicity (p < 0.01), with more white respondents and respondents from other ethnic minorities (65.9% and 45.7% respectively) reported agreeing at least somewhat, while only 21.3% of African-American respondents reported the same level of agreement.

Table 20: Courses Include Minority Group Perspectives
Many courses include minority group perspectives (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
7.1
7.6
6.8
32.8
5.1
11.4
Disagree Somewhat
30.6
31.2
30.1
45.9
29.0
42.9
Agree Somewhat
50.4
49.6
50.9
18.0
53.2
37.1
Agree Strongly
12.0
11.6
12.2
3.3
12.7
8.6
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Almost half (49.0%) of all respondents indicated agreeing at least somewhat with the statement "Many courses at NC State include feminist perspectives." This result is presented in Table 21. Male responses were significantly higher than female responses (p = 0.004), with 51.3% of males agreeing at least somewhat, and only 45.9% of females reporting the same level of agreement.

Table 21: Courses Include Feminist Perspectives
Many courses at NC State include feminist perspectives (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
9.0
12.0
6.9
17.7
8.3
11.8
Disagree Somewhat
42.0
42.1
41.7
43.5
41.5
50.0
Agree Somewhat
41.9
40.9
42.6
37.1
42.6
32.4
Agree Strongly
7.1
5.0
8.7
1.6
7.6
5.9
Gender: p < 0.01

With regard to the statement "Many courses at NC State involve community service," 29.5% of all graduating senior respondents reported agreeing at least somewhat with this statement (see Table 22). On the other hand, the majority of respondents (70.5%) indicated disagreeing at least somewhat with this statement. No differences in response were significant either by gender or by ethnicity.

Table 22: Courses Involve Community Service
Many courses at NC State involve community service (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
23.0
26.3
20.7
27.4
22.7
23.5
Disagree Somewhat
47.5
45.3
49.4
41.9
47.9
52.9
Agree Somewhat
26.4
25.3
26.9
24.2
26.5
23.5
Agree Strongly
3.1
3.3
3.0
6.5
3.0
0.0

The means and standard deviations for the Course Perspectives questions are displayed in Table 23, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 4, where 4 = agree strongly, 3 = agree somewhat, 2 = disagree somewhat, and 1 = disagree strongly.

Table 23: Course Perspective Means and Standard Deviations

Course Perspectives

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Courses include minority group perspectives mean:
2.67
2.65
2.68
1.92
2.73
2.43
sd:
0.78
0.78
0.77
0.80
0.74
0.81
Many courses include feminist perspectives mean:
2.47
2.39
2.53
2.23
2.50
2.32
sd:
0.76
0.76
0.75
0.76
0.75
0.77
Many courses involve community service mean:
2.10
2.06
2.12
2.10
2.10
2.00
sd:
0.78
0.80
0.76
0.88
0.78
0.70

Faculty Issues

Respondents were asked to rate their level of agreement with the statement "Faculty are interested in students' personal problems." Results are displayed in Table 24. Almost two thirds of all respondents (60.2%) indicated agreeing at least somewhat. No significant differences in response were found by either gender or ethnicity. There were several comments on this question, mostly stressing the need for good teachers who are genuinely interested in their students. A graduating senior from the College of Education and Psychology commented "Teachers who took the time to get to know me as a person made all the difference. In my opinion, teachers who are truly dedicated to their students don't receive enough recognition."

Table 24: Faculty Interest in Students' Personal Problems
Faculty are interested in students' personal problems (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
11.1
11.6
10.8
22.6
10.3
11.4
Disagree Somewhat
28.7
30.3
27.9
27.4
29.2
22.9
Agree Somewhat
49.1
45.6
51.7
40.3
49.9
45.7
Agree Strongly
11.1
12.5
9.6
9.7
10.6
20.0

The ratings of student agreement with the statement "Most faculty are sensitive to minority issues" are presented in Table 25. Most graduating senior respondents (82.4%) reported agreeing at least somewhat with this statement. Significant differences (p < 0.01) were found by ethnicity: Significantly more white respondents (86.3%) and respondents from other ethnic minorities (68.6%) agreed at least somewhat than did African-American respondents (33.9%).

Table 25: Faculty Sensitivity to Minority Issues
Most faculty are sensitive to minority issues (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
2.7
4.5
1.4
25.8
1.2
0.0
Disagree Somewhat
14.9
15.5
14.6
40.3
12.5
31.4
Agree Somewhat
63.6
61.0
65.4
25.8
66.6
54.3
Agree Strongly
18.8
19.0
18.7
8.1
19.7
14.3
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

When asked to report their agreement with the statement "Faculty are strongly interested in students' academic problems," 64.7% of all respondents indicated agreeing at least somewhat (see Table 26). Significantly (p < 0.01) more other minorities (74.3%) than African-Americans (46.8%) agreed at least somewhat with the statement.

There were many comments received relating to this question, several of which spoke very positively of the quality of teaching at NC State. One student noted that "For the most part my teachers were outstanding. The courses and the assignments made by the professors were usually extremely challenging and became a good lesson in time and stress management." Many other comments focused on what students perceived as a lack of caring or lack of interest on the part of some teachers. One student from the College of Engineering stated "Many of [NC State's] professors are concerned less with students' welfare than their own research credentials. Much more time and money should be invested in making sure professors teach well."

Table 26: Faculty Interest in Students' Academic Problems
Faculty are strongly interested in students' academic problems (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
8.6
8.3
8.8
11.3
8.4
8.6
Disagree Somewhat
26.7
28.8
25.3
41.9
26.1
17.1
Agree Somewhat
51.5
49.5
53.1
38.7
52.4
54.3
Agree Strongly
13.2
13.3
12.9
8.1
13.1
20.0
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

The ratings of how descriptive the statement "Students easily see faculty outside of office hours" is of NC State are shown in Table 27. The majority of all graduating seniors (82.6%) indicated that this statement was at least somewhat descriptive. Significantly (p < 0.01) more whites (83.6%) than African-Americans (67.8%) agreed at least somewhat with the statement. One student from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences commented that one of the most important things NC State could do to improve the quality of undergraduate experience would be to "Have more teacher availability outside of class."

Table 27: Contact With Faculty Outside of Office Hours
Students easily see faculty outside of office hours (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
17.5
15.0
19.2
32.3
16.4
20.0
Somewhat Descriptive
61.2
64.4
59.0
59.7
61.3
62.9
Very Descriptive
21.4
20.6
21.8
8.1
22.3
17.1
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

When asked the statement "There is little or no contact between students and faculty," slightly more than half (51.9%) of all respondents reported perceiving it as being not descriptive of NC State (see Table 28). Significantly more females than males (p = .002) found the statement not descriptive. There were a number of comments on this issue, with most of them stressing the need for greater interaction between students and faculty (e.g., "Closer student/teacher relations," "Better student/teacher interaction").

Table 28: Contact Between Students and Faculty
Little or no contact between students and faculty (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
51.9
56.5
48.7
40.3
52.6
57.1
Somewhat Descriptive
40.3
38.6
41.6
48.4
40.0
34.3
Very Descriptive
7.8
4.9
9.7
11.3
7.4
8.6
Gender: p < 0.01

Means and standard deviations for the first three Faculty Issues questions are presented in Table 29A, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 4, where 4 = agree strongly, 3 = agree somewhat, 2 = disagree somewhat, and 1 = disagree strongly.

Table 29A: Faculty Issues Means and Standard Deviations

Faculty Issues

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Faculty interested in students' personal problems mean:
2.60
2.59
2.60
2.37
2.61
2.74
sd:
0.83
0.85
0.81
0.94
0.81
0.92
Faculty sensitive to minority issuesmean:
2.99
2.95
3.01
2.16
3.05
2.83
sd:
0.67
0.72
0.62
0.91
0.61
0.66
Students easily see faculty outside of office hours mean:
2.04
2.06
2.03
1.76
2.06
1.97
sd:
0.62
0.59
0.64
0.59
0.62
0.62

Table 29B displays the means and standard deviations for the last two Faculty Issues questions, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 3, where 3 = very descriptive, 2 = somewhat descriptive, and 1 = not descriptive.

Table 29B: Faculty Issues Means and Standard Deviations

Faculty Issues

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Faculty interested in students' academic problems mean:
2.69
2.68
2.70
2.44
2.70
2.86
sd:
0.81
0.81
0.80
0.80
0.80
0.85
Little or no contact between students and faculty mean:
1.56
1.48
1.61
1.71
1.55
1.51
sd:
0.63
0.59
0.66
0.66
0.63
0.66

Extracurricular Activities

Approximately one third (31.0%) of all graduating senior respondents stated agreeing at least somewhat with the statement "Most students at NC State are strongly committed to community service" (see Table 30). It should be noted, however, that 69.0% of all respondents indicated disagreeing at least somewhat.

Table 30: Student Commitment to Community Service
Most students are strongly committed to community service (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree Strongly
22.2
23.4
21.4
29.5
21.6
26.5
Disagree Somewhat
46.8
47.3
46.5
37.7
47.6
44.1
Agree Somewhat
27.6
25.9
28.8
29.5
27.5
26.5
Agree Strongly
3.4
3.4
3.3
3.3
3.4
2.9

Only 36.6% of respondents felt the statement 'Social activities are overemphasized' was at least somewhat descriptive of NC State (see Table 31). However, significantly (p = 0.0008) fewer females (30.8%) than males (40.7%) felt this way.

Table 31: Social Activities are Overemphasized
Social activities are overemphasized (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
63.4
69.3
59.4
60.7
63.8
60.0
Somewhat Descriptive
30.8
26.5
33.7
32.8
30.3
37.1
Very Descriptive
5.8
4.3
7.0
6.6
5.9
2.9
Gender: p < 0.01

When asked how descriptive the statement "NC State provides opportunities for students to engage in community service" is of NC State, the majority (82.8%) of respondents reported that the statement was at least somewhat descriptive. Differences in response were significant by gender (p = 0.005), with female respondents finding this statement more descriptive of NC State than male respondents (84.2% and 81.8% respectively). These results are displayed in Table 32. Some graduating seniors were not aware of community service opportunities available at NC State. One graduating senior from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences said "Provide more opportunity for community service -- i.e. Student Assistants Volunteering in Emergency Situations (Fire Protection Division of Public Safety)."

Table 32: Opportunities To Engage In Community Service
NC State provides opportunities for student community service (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
17.2
15.8
18.2
11.3
17.4
22.9
Somewhat Descriptive
62.4
58.9
65.1
67.7
62.2
60.0
Very Descriptive
20.4
25.3
16.7
21.0
20.4
17.1
Gender: p < 0.01

Regarding the statement "Intercollegiate sports are overemphasized," the majority of respondents (80.9%) indicated that they felt that this was either not descriptive or only somewhat descriptive of NC State (see Table 33).

Table 33: Emphasis on Intercollegiate Sports
Intercollegiate sports are overemphasized (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
50.7
53.0
49.1
37.1
52.0
40.0
Somewhat Descriptive
30.2
27.7
31.9
35.5
29.3
42.9
Very Descriptive
19.1
19.3
19.1
27.4
18.7
17.1

Respondents' ratings of how descriptive the statement "Students here do not usually socialize with one another" is of NC State are presented in Table 34. Over three quarters (78.6%) of all graduating seniors reported this statement as being not descriptive of NC State. Significantly (p = 0.005) more males (24.6%) than females (16.8%) felt students did not usually socialize with one another.

Table 34: Student Socialization
Students do not usually socialize with one another (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Not Descriptive
78.6
83.2
75.4
64.5
79.8
73.5
Somewhat Descriptive
17.7
13.7
20.5
25.8
16.9
23.5
Very Descriptive
3.6
3.1
4.1
9.7
3.3
2.9
Gender: p < 0.01

Table 35A contains the Extracurricular Activities means and standard deviations for the first question, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 4, where 4 = agree strongly, 3 = agree somewhat, 2 = disagree somewhat, and 1 = disagree strongly.

Table 35A: Extracurricular Activities Means and Standard Deviations

Extracurricular Activities

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Students are strongly committed to community service mean:
2.12
2.09
2.14
2.07
2.13
2.06
sd:
0.79
0.79
0.79
0.85
0.78
0.81

Table 35B contains the means and standard deviations for the last four Extracurricular Activities questions, with mean scores ranked from highest to lowest for the total group. The responses were on a scale of 1 to 3, where 3 = very descriptive, 2 = somewhat descriptive, and 1 = not descriptive.

Table 35B: Extracurricular Activities Means and Standard Deviations

Extracurricular Activities

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Social activities are overemphasizedmean:
1.42
1.35
1.48
1.46
1.42
1.43
sd:
0.60
0.56
0.62
0.62
0.60
0.56
NC State provides opportunities for student community service mean:
2.03
2.10
1.98
2.10
2.03
1.94
sd:
0.61
0.63
0.59
0.56
0.61
0.64
Intercollegiate sports overemphasizedmean:
1.68
1.66
1.70
1.90
1.67
1.77
sd:
0.77
0.78
0.77
0.80
0.77
0.73
Students usually do not socialize with one another mean:
1.42
1.35
1.48
1.46
1.42
1.43
sd:
0.60
0.56
0.62
0.62
0.60
0.56


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STUDENT PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

This section provides ratings of graduating seniors' estimates of their growth and development on personal characteristics, as well as their estimates of the extent to which their NC State experience contributed to their current level of development in these areas.

Respondents were asked to rate their current level of development on six personal characteristics. The scale used was: 5 = very high, 4 = high, 3 = average, 2 = low, and 1 = very low. The means and standard deviations for each characteristic, ranked from high to low means for the total group, are listed in Table 36. The area that the graduating seniors felt that they achieved the highest current level of personal development was in their independence and self reliance; their lowest perceived area of development was in their ability to handle stress.

Significant differences were found by gender at the p = 0.0001 significance level, with men reporting higher levels of development than women on ability to handle stress and self-confidence.

Table 36: Current Level of Personal Characteristics

Characteristic

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other
Minorities
Independence & self-reliancemean:
4.38
4.32
4.42
4.26
4.38
4.43
sd:
0.72
0.78
0.67
0.98
0.70
0.65
Coping with changemean:
4.32
4.27
4.36
4.18
4.33
4.37
sd:
0.75
0.78
0.73
1.11
0.73
0.69
Sense of personal identitymean:
4.16
4.11
4.19
4.17
4.15
4.23
sd:
0.80
0.83
0.77
0.95
0.79
0.65
Potential for successmean:
4.03
3.94
4.08
4.13
4.01
4.20
sd:
0.87
0.92
0.83
0.96
0.87
0.68
Self-confidencemean:
3.98
3.85
4.08
4.07
3.98
3.97
sd:
0.86
0.92
0.79
1.11
0.84
0.89
Ability to handle stressmean:
3.93
3.77
4.05
3.93
3.93
4.00
sd:
0.93
0.96
0.88
1.05
0.92
0.87
Gender: p < 0.001

Respondents were also asked to rate the level of contribution to current developmental levels that they would attribute to their education at NC State. The scale used was: 5 = very greatly, 4 = greatly, 3 = moderately, 2 = little, and 1 = very little. The means and standard deviations for each characteristic, ranked from high to low for the total group, are displayed in Table 37. The area in which graduating seniors reported the highest level of college contribution to personal characteristics was coping with change; their lowest perceived area of educational contribution to personal characteristics was their sense of personal identity.

A significant difference was found by gender, with female respondents reporting a higher level of educational contribution to their sense of personal identity than male respondents (p = 0.002). No significant differences by ethnicity were observed.

Table 37: Extent of College Contribution to Personal Characteristics

Characteristic

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other
Minorities
Coping with changemean:
3.91
3.96
3.86
3.59
3.93
3.77
sd:
0.96
0.93
0.99
1.16
0.94
1.06
Independence & self-reliancemean:
3.71
3.79
3.65
3.62
3.71
3.83
sd:
1.06
1.08
1.05
1.18
1.06
1.04
Ability to handle stressmean:
3.56
3.53
3.58
3.47
3.57
3.51
sd:
1.17
1.18
1.16
1.33
1.16
1.12
Self-confidencemean:
3.49
3.51
3.48
3.23
3.50
3.60
sd:
1.01
1.02
1.01
1.10
1.00
1.06
Potential for successmean:
3.48
3.51
3.46
3.34
3.48
3.63
sd:
1.09
1.11
1.07
1.25
1.07
1.17
Sense of personal identitymean:
3.38
3.52
3.28
3.18
3.39
3.37
sd:
1.10
1.06
1.13
1.14
1.10
1.21
Gender: p < 0.01

Table 38 displays gap scores, which are defined as the difference between the mean score for students' perception of growth and development on personal characteristics and the mean score for the extent to which respondents attributed a contribution through the NC State experience to their development on personal characteristics. The values for gap scores can be interpreted in several ways. Large positive gap scores may indicate a perceived weakness in the level of educational contribution to the development of personal characteristics, or may be a function of the maturity level of NC State students on that characteristic. Of particular note is the large positive gap score for African-Americans and males with regard to sense of personal identity, which may indicate a perceived growth in maturity not necessarily connected with the university experience.

Table 38: Gap Scores of Personal Characteristics

Difference in Means

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Sense of personal identity
0.78
0.59
0.91
0.99
0.76
0.86
Independence & self-reliance
0.67
0.53
0.77
0.67
0.67
0.60
Potential for success
0.55
0.43
0.62
0.79
0.53
0.57
Self-confidence
0.49
0.34
0.60
0.84
0.48
0.37
Coping with change
0.41
0.31
0.50
0.59
0.40
0.60
Ability to handle stress
0.37
0.24
0.47
0.46
0.36
0.49


Chart 1: Comparison of Current Level and College Contribution




Tables 39A - 39F present the percentage responses for the questions concerning graduates’ assessment of their current level of development on personal characteristics

Tables 39A - 39F present the percentage responses for the questions concerning graduates' assessment of their current level of development on personal characteristics.

Table 39A: Self-Confidence

Self-confidence (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Low
0.6
0.9
0.3
1.7
0.4
2.9
Low
3.1
5.0
1.7
5.0
3.0
0.0
Average
20.9
25.7
17.6
16.7
21.2
22.9
High
46.6
42.9
49.5
31.7
47.8
45.7
Very High
28.8
25.5
30.9
45.0
27.6
28.6

Table 39B: Sense of Personal Identity

Sense of personal identity (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Low
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Low
1.5
1.9
1.2
0.0
1.6
0.0
Average
15.9
19.2
13.6
20.7
15.8
11.4
High
45.9
43.2
48.0
34.5
46.4
54.3
Very High
36.7
35.6
37.3
44.8
36.2
34.3

Table 39C: Independence and Self-Reliance
Independence and self-reliance (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Low
0.2
0.5
0.0
1.7
0.1
0.0
Low
0.5
0.7
0.3
0.0
0.5
0.0
Average
8.6
9.9
7.8
11.7
8.5
8.6
High
41.4
41.6
41.1
36.7
41.7
40.0
Very High
49.3
47.3
50.8
50.0
49.2
51.4

Table 39D: Potential for Success

Potential for success (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Low
0.2
0.2
0.2
1.7
0.1
0.0
Low
0.6
0.5
0.7
1.7
0.5
0.0
Average
10.7
13.1
9.1
22.0
10.0
11.4
High
42.2
42.5
41.9
18.6
43.7
40.0
Very High
46.3
43.7
48.1
55.9
45.6
48.6

Table 39E: Coping With Change

Coping with change (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Low
0.7
0.9
0.5
0.0
0.8
0.0
Low
2.6
4.3
1.5
3.3
2.7
0.0
Average
21.8
22.2
21.6
13.3
22.7
14.3
High
42.1
42.8
41.4
43.3
41.5
51.4
Very High
32.8
29.8
35.0
40.0
32.3
34.3

Table 39F: Ability to Handle Stress

Ability to handle stress (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Low
1.4
2.1
0.8
3.3
1.3
0.0
Low
3.3
5.4
1.9
4.9
3.0
8.6
Average
25.4
29.4
22.6
23.0
26.2
11.4
High
39.1
38.8
39.2
32.8
39.0
51.4
Very High
30.7
24.2
35.5
36.1
30.5
28.6

Tables 40A - 40F report the percentage responses of graduates' perceived level of NC State's contribution to these personal characteristics.

Table 40A: Self-Confidence

Self-confidence (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Little
3.4
4.0
3.1
9.8
3.0
5.7
Little
9.1
9.2
8.9
11.5
9.0
5.7
Moderately
36.4
34.2
38.2
34.4
36.9
31.4
Greatly
35.1
36.1
34.1
34.4
34.9
37.1
Very Greatly
16.1
16.5
15.7
9.8
16.3
20.0

Table 40B: Sense of Personal Identity

Sense of personal identity (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Little
5.3
5.2
5.5
11.7
4.9
5.7
Little
13.4
8.5
17.0
10.0
13.4
20.0
Moderately
32.6
32.8
32.5
38.3
32.4
28.6
Greatly
33.0
35.6
30.8
28.3
33.5
22.9
Very Greatly
15.7
17.9
14.1
11.7
15.7
22.9

Table 40C: Independence and Self-Reliance
Independence and self-reliance (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Little
3.8
4.7
3.1
10.0
3.4
2.9
Little
7.3
4.7
9.2
5.0
7.6
5.7
Moderately
25.7
23.7
27.2
20.0
26.0
28.6
Greatly
38.4
38.2
38.6
43.3
38.4
31.4
Very Greatly
24.8
28.7
21.9
21.7
24.7
31.4

Table 40D: Potential for Success

Potential for success (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Little
2.3
1.9
2.6
8.5
1.8
5.7
Little
3.9
3.1
4.4
6.8
3.6
5.7
Moderately
21.5
22.3
21.0
23.7
21.6
17.1
Greatly
43.7
41.6
45.3
39.0
43.9
48.6
Very Greatly
28.7
31.1
26.7
22.0
29.2
22.9

Table 40E: Coping With Change

Coping with change (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Little
5.8
7.1
4.7
13.6
5.2
5.7
Little
9.7
8.3
10.7
8.5
9.8
8.6
Moderately
31.6
28.6
34.1
25.4
32.2
31.4
Greatly
35.3
37.6
33.4
35.6
35.5
25.7
Very Greatly
17.6
18.3
17.1
16.9
17.2
28.6

Table 40F: Ability to Handle Stress

Ability to handle stress (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Little
6.8
7.8
6.2
15.0
6.4
5.7
Little
9.7
9.7
9.6
5.0
9.9
11.4
Moderately
26.8
26.0
27.4
23.3
27.0
28.6
Greatly
32.9
33.8
32.4
31.7
33.0
34.3
Very Greatly
23.8
22.7
24.5
25.0
23.8
20.0

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STUDENT SATISFACTION

This section provides ratings on reported levels of satisfaction students felt with the quality of 34 university experiences, student facilities, offices, or activities. In addition, ratings of the responsiveness of the staff in 15 of the areas are also reported.

For each question, significant differences in response by gender (T-tests) or ethnicity (ANOVA) are reported when found. Following the discussion of frequency results, means and standard deviations are presented. All frequencies were calculated omitting responses of "don't know/did not use" and "no contact" to portray the most accurate picture of students' attitudes and opinions. In cases where the response to "don't know/did not use" or "no contact" is greater than 5.0%, the number and percentage of respondents who answered in this manner is reported in the text.

Summary of Satisfaction Areas

The areas with which graduating seniors reported the highest satisfaction were: opportunities to join campus clubs and organizations; instruction in major; diversity of courses overall; internships, co-ops and field experiences or practica; and opportunities to participate in co-curricular activities. The areas in which they reported the least satisfaction were: services for commuter students; residence halls; career advising; financial aid services; and food service on campus.

A considerable amount of valuable information was also gained from the open-ended questions (questions 42 and 43) which asked for general comments on the respondents' experiences at NC State and areas of particular satisfaction/dissatisfaction. In relation to satisfaction with NC State, most respondents who expressed an opinion reported that they were satisfied with their experiences overall while at NC State. These respondents did, however, express concern for specific areas of academic life and student services that they felt needed to be improved. These suggestions are presented along with the tables and analysis for each individual question.

Instruction

Table 41 illustrates that most respondents (94.0%) were at least moderately satisfied with the instruction they received in their major field or program. One graduate from the College of Forest Resources said "I am particularly satisfied with the education I received from the College of Forest Resources. The education enhanced all aspects of my professional abilities. Professors in this curriculum are very helpful to students and exceptional in teaching their respective courses...". There were many positive comments relating to specific instructors, but there were also concerns expressed in open-ended comments from 41 students in Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, and other research-oriented disciplines that professors were too focused on research and did not devote enough time and energy to being quality teachers.


Table 41: Instruction in Major Field/Program
Instruction in major field/program (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
1.0
1.2
0.8
3.2
0.9
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
5.1
5.4
4.8
11.3
4.5
8.6
Moderately Satisfied
48.1
45.8
49.7
50.0
48.3
37.1
Very Satisfied
45.9
47.6
44.6
35.5
46.3
54.3

Overall instruction at NC State was also rated highly by graduating seniors, with 93.6% reporting at least moderate satisfaction. No significant differences were found by gender or by ethnicity (see Table 42).

Table 42: Overall Instruction

Overall instruction (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
0.7
1.2
0.3
1.6
0.6
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
5.8
5.6
5.9
8.2
5.5
8.6
Moderately Satisfied
68.4
64.2
71.4
65.6
68.9
60.0
Very Satisfied
25.2
28.9
22.4
24.6
24.9
31.4

Diversity of Courses

The majority of respondents (85.1%) indicated at least moderate satisfaction with the diversity of courses in their major field of study. This result is presented in Table 43. Individual comments on course diversity were many, but two themes were most prevalent. First was the issue of increasing the diversity of major requirements. Respondents from non-humanities and technical curricula repeatedly requested a more diverse curriculum that included more humanities and social science requirements. For example, a graduating senior from the College of Management wrote "Allow more freedom in choosing classes that fulfill non-curriculum requirements, e.g., history, social sciences, literature..." Of concern to respondents from humanities and social sciences curricula was the need for more courses specifically related to their major (e.g., more media courses for a communication major). Second was the issue of curriculum focus. Respondents from many different curricula requested inclusion of additional coursework in their major field of study. In addition, many respondents expressed a desire for courses that involved applying skills that they would need to work in their field.

Table 43: Diversity of Major Courses
Diversity of major courses (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
2.6
2.1
3.0
6.8
2.3
5.7
Moderately Dissatisfied
12.2
10.4
13.7
20.3
12.0
5.7
Moderately Satisfied
48.1
48.0
48.1
47.5
48.0
48.6
Very Satisfied
37.0
39.5
35.2
25.4
37.6
40.0

Satisfaction with the overall diversity of courses experienced by graduating seniors while at NC State was high, with 91.6% reporting at least moderate satisfaction (see Table 44). There were significant differences by gender (p = 0.002), with a greater percentage of women (93.0%) than men (90.6%) at least moderately satisfied. A wide range of comments were received on this issue, ranging from requests for a less diverse overall curriculum to increasing the number of free electives. Most comments, however, did favor some kind of increase in diversity of classes overall to enhance the NC State learning experience.

Table 44: Diversity of Courses Overall
Diversity of courses overall (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
1.3
1.2
1.4
1.7
1.2
2.9
Moderately Dissatisfied
7.1
5.8
8.0
15.5
6.6
5.7
Moderately Satisfied
52.5
47.7
56.0
50.0
52.5
60.0
Very Satisfied
39.1
45.3
34.6
32.8
39.7
31.4
Gender: p < 0.01

Availability of Courses

Most respondents (83.5%) reported at least moderate satisfaction with the availability of courses in their major field of study (see Table 45). The main issue with which respondents reported dissatisfaction in the area of major course availability was the fact that for some majors, courses required for the major were only offered once per year or were sometimes cancelled. This was reported by some respondents as being the reason they did not graduate in eight semesters or did not participate in any outside internship or cooperative education. One graduating senior wrote "Not enough courses [were] offered at the times I needed them... there were not enough classes offered to fill my graduation requirements, so I had to substitute an unrelated course just to graduate this year."

Table 45: Availability of Major Courses
Availability of major courses (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.4
2.8
3.9
3.3
3.5
2.9
Moderately Dissatisfied
13.0
11.3
14.4
18.0
12.9
8.6
Moderately Satisfied
44.8
43.8
45.6
42.6
44.8
48.6
Very Satisfied
38.7
42.1
36.1
36.1
38.8
40.0

Satisfaction with availability of courses overall at NC State was also high, with 88.3% of graduating seniors reporting at least moderate satisfaction (see Table 46). A significant difference was found by gender (p = 0.006), with 33.8% of female respondents very satisfied vs. 25.6% of male respondents very satisfied. Dissatisfaction with course availability appeared to be mainly from those respondents who were not able to attend classes during the day. Complaints from those respondents pertained to the overall scarcity of available classes, and there were some complaints from other respondents that they were unable to register for classes that they needed in their freshman and sophomore years.

Table 46: Availability of Courses Overall
Availability of courses overall (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
1.7
1.0
2.0
1.6
1.6
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
10.0
9.4
10.6
11.5
10.1
8.6
Moderately Satisfied
59.3
55.9
61.8
52.5
60.0
54.3
Very Satisfied
29.0
33.8
25.6
34.4
28.3
37.1
Gender: p < 0.01

Adequacy of Classroom and Laboratory Facilities

According to graduating senior respondents, 78.9% were at least moderately satisfied with classroom facilities at NC State (see Table 47). Primary reasons mentioned by respondents for dissatisfaction with classroom facilities were these: lack of cleanliness, lack of prompt and proper maintenance, age of furnishings, size of facilities (classroom overcrowding), and lack of adequate climate control.

Table 47: Adequacy of Classroom Facilities
Adequacy of classroom facilities (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.7
3.8
3.5
3.3
3.7
2.9
Moderately Dissatisfied
17.4
15.3
19.1
11.5
18.2
8.6
Moderately Satisfied
55.5
56.0
55.1
60.7
55.0
60.0
Very Satisfied
23.4
24.9
22.3
24.6
23.1
28.6

In regard to the adequacy of the laboratory facilities, 78.5% of graduating senior respondents who used them (n = 964) reported at least moderate satisfaction with the facilities at NC State (see Table 48). It should be noted that 5.3% (n=54) of all respondents indicated an answer of "don't know/did not use". Reasons given by respondents for being dissatisfied with laboratory facilities at NC State were as follows: worn out/out of date equipment, equipment not consistent with that used in corporate laboratory research facilities, lack of funding for materials, and lack of availability. Many respondents did not give specific reasons for dissatisfaction, but did indicate that an overall improvement in the quality of laboratory facilities was needed.

Table 48: Adequacy of Laboratory Facilities
Adequacy of laboratory facilities (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
4.6
3.4
5.4
0.0
4.8
6.3
Moderately Dissatisfied
16.9
15.0
18.1
14.0
17.2
12.5
Moderately Satisfied
53.9
55.0
53.5
61.4
53.6
56.3
Very Satisfied
24.6
26.6
23.0
24.6
24.4
25.0

Academic Advising

When asked about academic advising, more than two-thirds (68.3%) of the respondents reported that they were at least moderately satisfied with the quality of academic advising. On the other hand, 31.7% reported being moderately or very dissatisfied. See Table 49 for a breakdown of these percentages.

Table 49: Academic Advising

Academic advising (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
13.1
11.7
14.2
16.9
13.0
11.4
Moderately Dissatisfied
18.6
18.7
18.1
20.3
17.9
25.7
Moderately Satisfied
35.1
34.9
35.3
37.3
35.6
20.0
Very Satisfied
33.2
34.7
32.4
25.4
33.5
42.9

A large number of comments were received on the issue of academic advising. Of the 229 comments, 17 were positive and 212 were negative, which means that only one of every five respondents expressed a positive view of advising at NC State. Those respondents who commented positively on academic advising reported having an advisor who took a personal interest in them or otherwise went out of the way to provide them with some type of academic or personal assistance. Another frequent comment related to advising in the freshman year, with respondents stating that good advising and advice about majors and/or careers in the freshman year is critical for future academic success. One respondent from the College of Agriculture and Life sciences commented "Have advisors become more involved in the student's academic career during freshman year to help guide them through their years here at NC State...".

Prior information was obtained on the subject of student satisfaction with academic advising as a part of the 1993 Self-Study Survey of undergraduates and the 1995 Graduating Senior Survey. Table 49A displays the percentage response for satisfaction with the quality of academic advising from the seniors in the Self-Study Survey side by side with the corresponding percentages for the 1995 and 1996 Graduating Senior Surveys (all calculated with no opinion responses omitted). For the two middle categories, the first (non-italicized) response is the response category as given for the Self-Study Survey, while the second (italicized) response is the response category as given for the Graduating Senior Survey. 74.7% of Self-Study Survey respondents reported being satisfied or very satisfied with their academic advising. Only 68.0% of 1995 Graduating Senior Survey and 68.3% of 1996 Graduating Senior Survey respondents reported being moderately or very satisfied with the quality of academic advising. While these two rating scales are not an exact match and while the Self-Study Survey of undergraduates was a cross-sectional survey by class level, it is still meaningful to note first a decrease (1995) and then a leveling off (1996) in the satisfaction rating for academic advising based on the three most recent and most comprehensive indices of student satisfaction available.

Table 49A: Academic Advising Satisfaction Comparison

Academic advising (%)
1993 Self-Study Survey
1995 Graduating Senior Survey
1996 Graduating Senior Survey
Very Dissatisfied
7.1
13.3
13.1
Dissatisfied/Moderately Dissatisfied
18.2
18.7
18.6
Satisfied/Moderately Satisfied
46.0
33.9
35.1
Very Satisfied
28.7
34.1
33.2

A graphical representation of the change in student satisfaction with academic advising is presented in below in Chart 2.

Chart 2: Undergraduate Student Satisfaction with Academic Advising 1993-1996




Aspects of Academic Advising

Respondents' ratings of satisfaction with their advisors' ability to help them with required academic planning are displayed below in Table 50. The majority of graduating seniors (81.9%) indicated being at least moderately satisfied with this aspect of advising. No significant differences in response were detected by either gender or ethnicity. Open-ended commentary showed that this aspect of advising was extremely important to undergraduates. In spite of the overall positive rating for this question, however, there were comments from students claiming to have setbacks as a result of advisors not knowing curriculum changes or graduation requirements. A respondent from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences stated "Although I enjoyed talking to my advisor, I would have appreciated more knowledgeable advice on what courses to take to complete requirements for graduation...".

Table 50: Required Academic Planning

Required academic planning (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
7.1
6.0
7.8
13.6
6.6
8.8
Moderately Dissatisfied
11.0
11.8
10.4
11.9
11.1
5.9
Moderately Satisfied
39.9
36.2
42.3
40.7
39.5
47.1
Very Satisfied
42.0
45.9
39.6
33.9
42.9
38.2

Of the graduating senior respondents who reported utilization of their advisor for advice and discussion of academic matters (n = 897), 70.8% indicated at least moderate satisfaction with their advisor's ability in this area (see Table 51). It should be noted that of all respondents to this question, 12.6% (n=129) stated that they did not use their advisor for this purpose. Again, responses were not significantly different by gender or by ethnicity. Comments on this issue mostly pertained to areas such as discussion of academic progress or choice of major. One graduating senior who started off in the University Undesignated program wrote "I appreciated the amount of personal guidance my freshman year from my advisor. She helped me work through my confusion concerning my major...".

Table 51: Advice and Discussion of Academic Matters
Advice and discussion of academic matters (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
12.8
15.0
11.4
23.3
12.4
6.1
Moderately Dissatisfied
16.4
14.5
17.7
16.7
15.9
27.3
Moderately Satisfied
35.0
31.4
37.3
33.3
35.0
33.3
Very Satisfied
35.8
39.1
33.7
26.7
36.7
33.3

Of the respondents who indicated utilizing their advisor for career advising (n = 852), almost two thirds (64.5%) reported at least moderate satisfaction with this aspect of advising (see Table 52). The percentage of all respondents who answered this question but stated that they did not use their advisor in this capacity was 16.8% (n=172). Most comments on this issue related to advisors not being able to link career options to the student's major field of study. A graduating senior from the College of Engineering commented "I was very dissatisfied with advising my freshman and sophomore years. I was ill-prepared to find a career. Advisors should suggest paths to reach our goals...".

Table 52: Career Advising

Career advising (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
16.9
18.5
15.9
25.9
16.5
10.7
Moderately Dissatisfied
18.5
18.8
18.1
17.2
18.4
21.4
Moderately Satisfied
31.8
27.5
34.8
32.8
31.2
42.9
Very Satisfied
32.7
35.3
31.2
24.1
33.9
25.0

The majority (79.8%) of respondents who rated their advisor for knowledge of policies and procedures (n = 964) were at least moderately satisfied with their advisor's knowledge (see Table 53). Of all respondents who answered this question, only 5.6% (n=57) gave a response of "don't know/did not use."

Table 53: Knowledge of University Policies and Procedures
Knowledge of university policies/procedures (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
9.3
10.8
8.2
16.4
8.4
18.2
Moderately Dissatisfied
10.9
12.0
9.8
9.8
10.9
9.1
Moderately Satisfied
39.2
35.3
42.0
41.0
39.1
39.4
Very Satisfied
40.6
41.9
40.0
32.8
41.6
33.3

Interaction with Faculty

At least moderate satisfaction with opportunities for interaction with faculty outside of the classroom was reported by 78.5% of respondents (see Table 54). Female responses to this question were significantly different from male responses (p = 0.01), with 80.9% of female respondents and 77.0% of male respondents reporting being at least moderately satisfied.

Table 54: Opportunity for Interaction with Faculty Outside of the Classroom
Opportunity for interaction with faculty (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
5.3
3.0
7.0
9.1
5.3
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
16.2
16.0
16.0
29.1
15.2
17.6
Moderately Satisfied
49.7
48.6
50.5
41.8
50.0
55.9
Very Satisfied
28.8
32.3
26.5
20.0
29.5
26.5
Gender: p < 0.01

Academic Support Services

Of those spring 1996 respondents (n = 614) who reported utilizing academic support services at NC State, the majority (86.6%) indicated at least moderate satisfaction with the quality of service they received (see Table 55). No significant differences were found by either gender or ethnicity. It is important to note that 40.3% (n=415) of the seniors responding to this question indicated that they didn't know about or did not use these services. The comments on this question focused primarily on the need for a better way to publicize the availability of academic support services to the undergraduate population.

Table 55: Academic Support Services
Academic support services (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
2.0
2.3
1.7
2.0
1.7
7.4
Moderately Dissatisfied
11.4
8.2
13.9
11.8
10.9
22.2
Moderately Satisfied
60.1
59.5
60.3
62.7
60.5
44.4
Very Satisfied
26.5
30.0
24.1
23.5
26.9
25.9

Career Planning and Placement

Of those respondents who reported using career services/employment assistance (n = 834), 76.4% stated at least moderate satisfaction with the quality of these services at NC State (see Table 56). Of the graduating seniors who answered this question, 18.3% (n=187) reported that they did not know about or did not use career services/employment assistance.

The comments on this issue reflected strongly held opinions. Graduates from programs with specific employment outcomes (e.g., College of Textiles, College of Engineering, College of Management, and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences) were particularly satisfied with placement services. One respondent from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences wrote "Career Planning and Placement provided good resources - books, seminars, and on-line resumes..." Respondents from the programs that did not have such specific employment outcomes (e.g., College of Humanities and Social Sciences and College of Education and Psychology) reported less satisfaction with placement services. Respondents from these programs commented that they perceived a preference towards assisting students from the technical curricula while their needs were not as well attended. A graduate from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences wrote "[increase] job opportunities in Career Planning and Placement for humanities majors...".

Table 56: Career Services/Employment Assistance
Career services/employment assistance (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
9.2
7.9
10.2
9.8
9.3
6.9
Moderately Dissatisfied
14.4
15.2
13.9
17.6
14.4
10.3
Moderately Satisfied
48.3
49.6
47.3
45.1
48.6
44.8
Very Satisfied
28.1
27.3
28.6
27.5
27.7
37.9

Financial Aid Services

Table 57 shows that of those graduating seniors who reported utilizing financial aid services (n = 587), 64.4% were at least moderately satisfied. 35.6% of respondents reported being either moderately or very dissatisfied with financial aid services, and while some of this may be attributed to respondents receiving low awards or no aid at all, there were some specific reasons given as part of the commentary. One repeatedly stated reason was the perceived lack of adequate customer service training for financial aid staff. One College of Forest Resources graduate stated "In regard to service from Financial Aid: Amiable representatives with genuine interest in assisting students would be helpful, as well as a [quicker] turnover of paperwork to its necessary designated places...". 42.3% (n=430) of the respondents indicated they didn't know about or did not use financial aid services.

Table 57: Financial Aid Services

Financial aid services (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
16.2
15.5
16.7
16.0
16.3
14.3
Moderately Dissatisfied
19.4
21.8
18.1
16.0
20.6
0.0
Moderately Satisfied
42.8
40.0
44.1
40.0
42.6
47.6
Very Satisfied
21.6
22.7
21.1
28.0
20.4
38.1

Residence Halls

Of those respondents who indicated living in residence halls while at NC State (n = 709), 72.5% were at least moderately satisfied with the quality of their living experience (see Table 58). Of the 1,012 graduating seniors who answered this question, 29.9% (n=303) reported they either didn't know about or did not use the residence halls. Respondents had varied comments on this subject. Some respondents focused on physical plant and maintenance issues such as lack of air conditioning in summer, heat that would not turn off in winter, age and disrepair of some buildings, lack of adequate computer facilities, the need for better laundry facilities, lack of adequate residence hall parking, and perceived inadequacies in the performance of cleaning staff. Others were more concerned with social issues such as increased social activities in or near the residence halls, improved selection processes for Resident Assistants, and enforcement of residence hall safety codes.

Table 58: Residence Halls

Residence halls (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
5.9
6.7
5.4
1.9
6.2
7.7
Moderately Dissatisfied
21.6
22.3
21.2
33.3
20.6
23.1
Moderately Satisfied
58.8
58.0
59.2
55.6
59.0
57.7
Very Satisfied
13.7
13.1
14.2
9.3
14.2
11.5

Services for Commuter Students

When asked about the quality of services for commuter students, 69.3% of respondents who commuted (n = 560) indicated at least moderate satisfaction. These results are presented in Table 59. 45.1% (n=460) of respondents either did not know about or did not utilize these services. Many commuter respondents stated that cost of parking stickers and lack of consistent availability of parking spaces were the two greatest sources of dissatisfaction with these services. It was also mentioned that the University could provide additional services for commuter students. A graduating senior in Animal Science wrote that it would improve the undergraduate experience if there were "More places for commuters to sit and eat lunch, and places for commuters to lock their belongings...".

Table 59: Services for Commuter Students
Services for commuter students (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
10.5
10.4
10.8
8.3
11.2
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
20.2
22.2
19.2
8.3
20.6
27.3
Moderately Satisfied
47.5
46.2
47.7
41.7
46.9
59.1
Very Satisfied
21.8
21.2
22.4
41.7
21.4
13.6

Food Service on Campus

Respondents who used food service on campus (n = 782) expressed somewhat more satisfaction than dissatisfaction with food service on campus, with 55.6% moderately to very satisfied and 44.4% moderately to very dissatisfied (see Table 60). 23.2% (n=236) of the graduating seniors who responded to this question didn't know about or did not use campus food service. Responses to this question were found to be significantly different by ethnicity (p < 0.01), with significantly more white respondents and African-American respondents (57.0% and 51.8% respectively) than respondents from other ethnic minorities (28.6%) indicating at least moderate satisfaction. Respondents who commented on this question expressed a desire for a greater variety of food service options on campus, with more health-conscious food options and moderate pricing.

Table 60: Food Service on Campus

Food service on campus (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
16.0
16.7
15.4
18.5
15.2
28.6
Moderately Dissatisfied
28.4
28.9
28.2
29.6
27.8
42.9
Moderately Satisfied
46.9
46.6
47.0
40.7
48.1
28.6
Very Satisfied
8.7
7.7
9.4
11.1
8.9
0.0
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Library Services

The majority of graduating seniors were pleased with the quality of NC State library services, with 85.1% of respondents reporting at least moderate satisfaction (see Table 61). There were significant differences in response by ethnicity (p < 0.01), with 97.1% of respondents from other ethnic minorities but only 84.6% of white respondents at least moderately satisfied. The most often mentioned concerns about library services were: increasing funding for journal subscriptions; increasing hours of operation; opening the Hillsborough St. Entrance; and updating library reference materials. Respondents from the Colleges of Forest Resources, Education and Psychology, and Humanities and Social Sciences repeatedly mentioned having to utilize libraries at other local institutions of higher learning such as Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill. A Department of English graduate said "Subscribe to more journals in the library. As an English major, it is very inconvenient to have to travel to UNC to do research...".


Table 61: Library Services

Library services (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.6
5.0
2.5
1.7
3.8
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
11.4
12.7
10.5
15.0
11.5
2.9
Moderately Satisfied
58.3
54.1
61.1
53.3
58.8
50.0
Very Satisfied
26.8
28.1
25.9
30.0
25.8
47.1
Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Computer Labs

Satisfaction with the quality of computer lab/center services was also high, with 84.7% of all graduating senior respondents moderately to very satisfied. These results are presented in Table 62. The numerous comments on computer facilities focused on having more computer labs (both on campus and in the residence halls), increasing the number and quality of the computers in the labs, and making twenty-four hour computing available to students from all curricula.

Table 62: Computer Lab/Center Services
Computer lab/center services (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.3
4.7
2.4
5.1
3.4
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
11.9
11.2
12.4
6.8
12.1
15.2
Moderately Satisfied
53.2
52.4
54.0
50.8
53.9
42.4
Very Satisfied
31.5
31.8
31.2
37.3
30.6
42.4

Other Student Services

The majority of respondents (77.1%) were at least moderately satisfied with bookstore services and products (see Table 63). Responses were found to be significantly different by gender (p = 0.002), with 80.9% of women moderately to very satisfied and only 74.5% of men moderately to very satisfied.

Table 63: Bookstore Services and Products
Bookstore services and products (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
5.9
3.4
7.7
5.0
5.9
6.1
Moderately Dissatisfied
17.0
15.8
17.8
21.7
16.7
15.2
Moderately Satisfied
55.6
56.4
55.0
51.7
55.9
54.5
Very Satisfied
21.5
24.5
19.5
21.7
21.5
24.2
Gender: p < 0.01

Satisfaction with the registration process at NC State was high, with 85.3% of respondents reporting at least moderate satisfaction (see Table 64).

Table 64: Registration Process

Registration process (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
2.5
1.9
2.7
1.6
2.5
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
12.3
9.5
14.3
11.5
12.5
8.8
Moderately Satisfied
49.8
51.1
48.9
47.5
49.5
61.8
Very Satisfied
35.5
37.5
34.1
39.3
35.4
29.4

Table 65 shows that satisfaction with the business office and cashier was high, with 83.2% of respondents who reported using those services (n = 793) stating at least moderate satisfaction. 21.3% (n=214) of respondents either didn't know about or did not use the business office and cashier.

Table 65: Business Office/Cashier

Business office/cashier (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
5.0
5.2
4.8
1.8
5.2
3.8
Moderately Dissatisfied
11.7
11.3
12.1
16.4
11.5
11.5
Moderately Satisfied
61.9
63.1
61.2
65.5
61.8
57.7
Very Satisfied
21.3
20.4
21.9
16.4
21.5
26.9

Of those graduating seniors who reported using the Counseling Center (n = 266), 81.2% were at least moderately satisfied (see Table 66). It should be noted, however, that almost three-fourths (73.5%; n=737) of the respondents indicated that they didn't know about or did not use the Counseling Center.

Table 66: Counseling Center

Counseling center (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
8.3
10.2
6.8
4.0
9.1
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
10.5
10.2
10.9
12.0
10.8
0.0
Moderately Satisfied
49.6
44.9
53.1
48.0
50.0
37.5
Very Satisfied
31.6
34.7
29.3
36.0
30.2
62.5

Table 67 reveals that the majority (86.5%) of respondents who reported using the Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry (n = 118) were at least moderately satisfied with the services provided. It is notable, however, 88.2% (n=881) of the respondents indicated that they did not know about or did not use these services.

Table 67: Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry
Chaplains Cooperative Ministry (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.4
5.1
2.6
12.5
2.8
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
10.2
12.8
9.0
0.0
10.4
33.3
Moderately Satisfied
55.1
41.0
61.5
37.5
57.5
0.0
Very Satisfied
31.4
41.0
26.9
50.0
29.2
66.7

Satisfaction with the quality of service from the office of Registration and Records at NC State was quite high, with 88.0% of all respondents stating that they were moderately to very satisfied (see Table 68).

Table 68: Registration and Records

Registration and Records (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.0
2.5
3.4
1.6
3.1
3.1
Moderately Dissatisfied
9.0
8.1
9.4
6.6
9.3
0.0
Moderately Satisfied
59.0
57.1
60.4
62.3
58.7
62.5
Very Satisfied
29.0
32.3
26.9
29.5
28.9
34.4

When asked about the quality of student health services at NC State, 81.6% of respondents who used them (n = 844) indicated that they were moderately to very satisfied with the quality of these services. The percentages are displayed in Table 69. 17.1% (n=174) of respondents reported that they did not know about or did not use these services. Significant differences in response were observed by gender (p = 0.004), with more male respondents (84.5%) than female respondents (77.5%) reporting at least moderate satisfaction. This difference may indicate a perception that the health center is less responsive to women's health needs than to those of male students.

Table 69: Student Health Services

Student health services (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
5.2
6.8
4.0
5.4
5.1
7.7
Moderately Dissatisfied
13.3
15.6
11.6
14.3
13.3
11.5
Moderately Satisfied
53.0
52.3
53.4
55.4
52.6
57.7
Very Satisfied
28.6
25.2
31.1
25.0
29.0
23.1
Gender: p < 0.01

Student Activities

The majority of respondents (87.1%, n = 643) who participated in campus-sponsored recreational activities were at least moderately satisfied (see Table 70). It should be noted that 36.4% (n=368) of respondents didn't know about or did not participate in these activities.

Table 70: Campus-Sponsored Recreational Opportunities
Campus-sponsored recreational opportunity (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
2.3
1.6
2.8
2.2
2.4
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
10.6
9.3
11.5
6.7
10.3
27.3
Moderately Satisfied
57.9
56.7
58.5
71.1
57.4
40.9
Very Satisfied
29.2
32.4
27.2
20.0
29.8
31.8

Table 71 reveals that the opportunity to participate in co-curricular activities while at NC State was reported as being at least moderately satisfactory by 91.1% of graduating seniors (n = 764). Women reported a significantly higher level of satisfaction than men (p = 0.0008), with 42.9% of female respondents very satisfied vs. 29.6% of male respondents very satisfied. Approximately one fourth (25.1%; n=256) of the respondents to this question reported that they did not know about or did not participate in co-curricular activities. Most comments on this issue focused on publicizing activities better or on having more activities available at varied times to allow greater participation.

Table 71: Opportunity to Participate in Co-Curricular Activities
Opportunity to participate in co-curricular activities (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
1.0
0.6
1.4
0.0
1.2
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
7.9
7.5
8.2
10.4
7.7
8.7
Moderately Satisfied
55.8
48.9
60.8
50.0
56.6
39.1
Very Satisfied
35.3
42.9
29.6
39.6
34.6
52.2
Gender: p < 0.001

Table 72 shows that of those graduating seniors who indicated participation in internships, co-ops, and field experiences of practica (n = 539), 84.7% were at least moderately satisfied with the experience. Of the seniors who answered this question, 46.7% (n=472) stated that they did not know about or did not participate in these activities.

Table 72: Internships, Co-ops, and Field Experiences or Practica
Internships/co-ops/field experiences and practica (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
5.2
3.3
6.5
2.7
5.6
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
10.0
7.1
12.0
13.5
9.4
21.1
Moderately Satisfied
37.8
40.3
36.0
37.8
37.5
42.1
Very Satisfied
46.9
49.3
45.5
45.9
47.5
36.8

Of the respondents who reported participation in campus clubs and organizations at NC State (n = 896), 93.6% reported being moderately to very satisfied with the opportunities to join these clubs and organizations. Female respondents reported significantly higher satisfaction than did male respondents (p = 0.0005), with 56.9% of females but only 42.4% of males stating they were very satisfied (see Table 73). 12.2% (n=125) of the respondents to this question indicated that they did not know about or did not participate in these activities.

Table 73: Opportunities to Join Campus Clubs and Organizations
Opportunities to join clubs and organizations (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
1.0
0.8
1.1
0.0
1.0
3.2
Moderately Dissatisfied
5.4
5.4
5.3
10.3
5.0
6.5
Moderately Satisfied
45.4
36.9
51.1
43.1
45.5
41.9
Very Satisfied
48.2
56.9
42.4
46.6
48.5
48.4
Gender: p < 0.001

Personal Safety on Campus

When asked about their feelings towards personal safety on campus, of the 968 respondents 84.2% stated that they were at least moderately satisfied with their safety. 5.1% (n=52) of respondents indicated that they did not know about their personal safety. Responses (see Table 74) were found to be significantly different by gender (p = 0.0001), with 89.7% of men moderately to very satisfied and only 76.8% of women moderately to very satisfied. In the 23 comments received on this issue, three themes were most prevalent: improve campus lighting; improve response time for the student escort service; and provide more 'blue light' stations on campus.

Table 74: Personal Safety on Campus

Personal safety on campus (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Dissatisfied
3.3
4.7
2.1
6.6
3.1
0.0
Moderately Dissatisfied
12.5
18.5
8.2
14.8
12.5
6.1
Moderately Satisfied
56.4
54.9
57.7
50.8
56.6
63.6
Very Satisfied
27.8
21.9
32.0
27.9
27.7
30.3
Gender: p < 0.001

Means and Standard Deviations

The means and standard deviations for questions related to student satisfaction, ranked from highest to lowest for the total group, are displayed in Table 75. The scale used was: 4 = very satisfied, 3 = moderately satisfied, 2 = moderately dissatisfied, and 1 = very dissatisfied. It is important to note that don't know/did not use responses were omitted in calculating the means.

Table 75: Student Satisfaction Means and Standard Deviations

Student Satisfaction

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Opportunities to join clubs and organizations mean:
3.41
3.50
3.35
3.36
3.42
3.35
sd:
0.64
0.64
0.63
0.67
0.63
0.75
Instruction in major mean:
3.39
3.40
3.38
3.18
3.40
3.46
sd:
0.63
0.65
0.62
0.76
0.62
0.66
Diversity of courses overall mean:
3.29
3.37
3.24
3.14
3.31
3.20
sd:
0.65
0.65
0.65
0.74
0.65
0.68
Internships/co-ops/field experiences/practica mean:
3.27
3.36
3.21
3.27
3.27
3.16
sd:
0.84
0.76
0.89
0.80
0.85
0.76
Opportunity to participate in co-curricular activities mean:
3.25
3.34
3.19
3.29
3.25
3.43
sd:
0.64
0.64
0.63
0.65
0.64
0.66
Diversity of major courses mean:
3.19
3.25
3.16
2.92
3.21
3.23
sd:
0.75
0.72
0.77
0.86
0.74
0.81
Availability of major courses mean:
3.19
3.25
3.14
3.11
3.19
3.26
sd:
0.79
0.76
0.80
0.82
0.79
0.74
Overall instruction mean:
3.18
3.21
3.16
3.13
3.18
3.23
sd:
0.55
0.59
0.52
0.62
0.55
0.60
Registration process mean:
3.18
3.24
3.14
3.25
3.18
3.21
sd:
0.74
0.70
0.76
0.72
0.74
0.59
Required academic planning mean:
3.17
3.22
3.14
2.95
3.19
3.15
sd:
0.89
0.88
0.89
1.01
0.88
0.89
Availability of courses overall mean:
3.16
3.23
3.11
3.20
3.15
3.29
sd:
0.66
0.65
0.66
0.70
0.65
0.62
Registration and Records mean:
3.14
3.19
3.11
3.20
3.13
3.28
sd:
0.69
0.69
0.70
0.63
0.70
0.63
Campus-sponsored recreational opportunitiesmean:
3.14
3.20
3.10
3.09
3.15
3.05
sd:
0.69
0.67
0.70
0.60
0.69
0.79
Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry mean:
3.14
3.18
3.13
3.25
3.13
3.33
sd:
0.73
0.85
0.67
1.04
0.70
1.15
Computer lab/center services mean:
3.13
3.11
3.14
3.20
3.12
3.27
sd:
0.74
0.78
0.72
0.78
0.74
0.72
Academic support services mean:
3.11
3.17
3.07
3.08
3.13
2.89
sd:
0.67
0.67
0.67
0.66
0.66
0.89
Knowledge of university policies/procedures mean:
3.11
3.08
3.14
2.90
3.14
2.88
sd:
0.94
0.98
0.90
1.04
0.92
1.08
Personal safety on campus mean:
3.09
2.94
3.20
3.00
3.09
3.24
sd:
0.73
0.77
0.67
0.84
0.72
0.56
Library services mean:
3.08
3.05
3.10
3.12
3.07
3.44
sd:
0.72
0.78
0.67
0.72
0.72
0.56
Student health services mean:
3.05
2.96
3.12
3.00
3.05
2.96
sd:
0.79
0.83
0.76
0.79
0.79
0.82
Counseling center mean:
3.05
3.04
3.05
3.16
3.01
3.63
sd:
0.87
0.93
0.82
0.80
0.88
0.52
Opportunity for interaction with faculty mean:
3.02
3.10
2.97
2.73
3.04
3.09
sd:
0.81
0.77
0.84
0.89
0.81
0.67
Business office/cashier mean:
2.99
2.99
3.00
2.96
3.00
3.08
sd:
0.73
0.73
0.73
0.64
0.73
0.74
Adequacy of classroom facilities mean:
2.99
3.02
2.96
3.07
2.98
3.14
sd:
0.75
0.74
0.74
0.70
0.75
0.69
Adequacy of laboratory facilities mean:
2.99
3.05
2.94
3.11
2.97
3.00
sd:
0.77
0.74
0.79
0.62
0.78
0.80
Career services/employment assistance mean:
2.95
2.96
2.94
2.90
2.95
3.14
sd:
0.89
0.86
0.91
0.92
0.89
0.88
Advice/discussion of academic matters mean:
2.94
2.95
2.93
2.63
2.96
2.94
sd:
1.02
1.07
0.98
1.12
1.01
0.93
Bookstore services and products mean:
2.93
3.02
2.86
2.90
2.93
2.97
sd:
0.78
0.73
0.81
0.80
0.78
0.81
Academic advising mean:
2.88
2.93
2.86
2.71
2.89
2.94
sd:
1.01
1.00
1.03
1.03
1.01
1.08
Services for commuter students mean:
2.81
2.78
2.82
3.17
2.78
2.86
sd:
0.90
0.90
0.90
0.92
0.91
0.64
Residence halls mean:
2.80
2.77
2.82
2.72
2.81
2.73
sd:
0.74
0.76
0.73
0.66
0.75
0.78
Career advising mean:
2.80
2.80
2.81
2.55
2.82
2.82
sd:
1.07
1.11
1.05
1.13
1.07
0.94
Financial aid services mean:
2.70
2.70
2.70
2.80
2.67
3.10
sd:
0.98
0.99
0.99
1.03
0.98
1.00
Food service on campus mean:
2.48
2.45
2.50
2.44
2.51
2.00
sd:
0.86
0.86
0.86
0.92
0.86
0.77

Summary Charts

Summary charts for the student satisfaction charts are on the following two pages, broken down into two main areas of interest: satisfaction with academic areas, and satisfaction with student services

Academic Areas

To enable the reader to gain an overview of student satisfaction in academic areas, percentage rankings of respondents who reported at least moderate satisfaction with the quality of NC State academic areas are displayed in Chart 3. Important to note is that these percentages were calculated excluding "don't know/did not use" responses.

Student Services

The percentage of respondents who reported at least moderate satisfaction with the quality of NC State student services are ranked from greatest to least in Chart 4. These percentages were also calculated excluding "don't know/did not use" responses.

Chart 3: Satisfaction With the Quality of NC State Academic Areas


Chart 4: Satisfaction With the Quality of NC State Student Services

Summary of Staff Responsiveness

Summary of Staff Responsiveness

Respondents were asked to rate the responsiveness of NC State staff in 15 administrative and student service areas. It is interesting to note that no significant differences (p < 0.01) in response by gender or ethnicity were found for any of the services rated.

The services where graduating seniors reported the highest staff responsiveness were: chaplains' cooperative ministry, career services, and library. The services where they reported the least staff responsiveness were: financial aid and food service.

Responsiveness Areas

Career services/employment assistance staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 87.5% of the 560 graduating senior respondents (see Table 76). 19.7% (n=137) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area. Several comments centered on the need for more counselors, and one student suggested involving faculty more.

Table 76: Career Services/Employment Assistance Staff
Career services/employment assistance staff (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
3.9
4.4
3.6
2.7
4.0
5.6
Moderately Unresponsive
8.6
6.3
10.5
10.8
8.8
0.0
Moderately Responsive
42.1
36.9
46.2
43.2
42.2
33.3
Very Responsive
45.4
52.4
39.7
43.2
45.0
61.1

Financial Aid staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 62.6% of the 404 graduating senior respondents (see Table 77). 40.1% (n=271) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area. Nineteen graduates commented on the need for financial aid staff to be more helpful and courteous, and several of these suggested hiring more staff. One comment in particular seems to sum up the probable reason for this dissatisfaction: "My most unpleasant experiences were with financial aid. There are only two people (sometimes only 1) at the desk who help walk-ins as well as answer the phones. This person is very overworked and gets abused by students who have stood in long lines...".

Table 77: Financial Aid Staff

Financial Aid staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
17.8
21.6
15.3
19.5
17.9
14.3
Moderately Unresponsive
19.6
19.2
19.6
19.5
19.9
7.1
Moderately Responsive
41.1
38.9
42.6
41.5
40.9
42.9
Very Responsive
21.5
20.4
22.6
19.5
21.3
35.7

Of the 681 graduating seniors who rated the Bookstore staff, 84.8% felt the staff was at least moderately responsive (see Table 78).

Table 78: Bookstore Staff

Bookstore staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
2.1
2.0
1.8
0.0
2.0
5.3
Moderately Unresponsive
13.1
11.1
14.8
14.0
13.0
15.8
Moderately Responsive
55.9
54.7
56.7
58.1
55.9
47.4
Very Responsive
28.9
32.2
26.6
27.9
29.1
31.6

Responsiveness of the registration process staff was rated high, with 88.5% of the 549 graduating senior respondents reporting at least moderate responsiveness (see Table 79). 18.9% (n=128) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 79: Registration Process Staff

Registration process staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
2.0
3.0
1.3
0.0
2.3
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
9.5
8.4
10.4
7.0
9.5
16.7
Moderately Responsive
51.7
47.3
55.0
34.9
53.4
44.4
Very Responsive
36.8
41.4
33.3
58.1
34.8
38.9

Residence hall staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 73.7% of the 456 graduating senior respondents (see Table 80). 31.2% (n=207) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 80: Residence Hall Staff

Residence hall staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
7.9
7.4
8.3
5.4
8.3
5.9
Moderately Unresponsive
18.4
18.1
18.8
18.9
18.0
29.4
Moderately Responsive
50.9
50.5
51.1
45.9
52.0
35.3
Very Responsive
22.8
23.9
21.8
29.7
21.8
29.4

Of the 468 graduating seniors who rated Food Service staff, 61.1% felt they were at least moderately responsive (see Table 81). 28.4% (n=186) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area. Several comments received on this area point to a perceived lack of courtesy to students as a reason for the dissatisfaction.

Table 81: Food Service Staff

Food service staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
12.2
12.2
12.2
17.1
11.8
12.5
Moderately Unresponsive
26.7
27.1
26.5
14.3
27.2
43.8
Moderately Responsive
46.4
46.3
46.2
54.3
46.4
25.0
Very Responsive
14.7
14.4
15.1
14.3
14.7
18.8



Campus-sponsored recreational activity staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 91.2% of the 332 graduating senior respondents, a very high rating (see Table 82). 46.5% (n=289) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 82: Campus-sponsored Recreational Staff
Campus-sponsored recreational staff (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
2.1
1.6
2.4
0.0
2.4
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
6.6
5.6
7.3
4.0
6.8
11.1
Moderately Responsive
58.7
57.3
60.0
64.0
59.3
33.3
Very Responsive
32.5
35.5
30.2
32.0
31.5
55.6

Responsiveness of the Library staff was rated high, with 88.7% of the 676 graduating senior respondents reporting at least moderate responsiveness (see Table 83).

Table 83: Library Staff

Library staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
2.5
3.6
1.6
2.4
2.6
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
8.7
8.6
9.0
12.2
8.5
9.5
Moderately Responsive
47.3
45.2
48.6
43.9
47.6
38.1
Very Responsive
41.4
42.6
40.8
41.5
41.2
52.4

Computer lab/center staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 77.5% of the 604 graduating senior respondents (see Table 84). 11.7 % (n=80) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 84: Computer Lab/Center Staff

Computer lab/center staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
5.3
3.8
6.5
0.0
5.9
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
17.2
15.2
18.7
13.5
17.6
10.5
Moderately Responsive
48.5
50.2
47.2
40.5
49.6
31.6
Very Responsive
29.0
30.8
27.6
45.9
26.8
57.9

Student health services staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 84.5% of the 588 graduating senior respondents (see Table 85). 15.8% (n=110) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 85: Student Health Services Staff

Student health services staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
5.4
6.5
4.5
0.0
6.1
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
10.0
10.9
9.1
11.9
9.5
17.6
Moderately Responsive
44.9
46.0
44.0
35.7
45.6
47.1
Very Responsive
39.6
36.6
42.4
52.4
38.8
35.3

Of the 549 graduating seniors who rated the Business office/cashier staff, 83.8% felt they were at least moderately responsive (see Table 86). 18.5% (n=125) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 86: Business Office/Cashier Staff

Business office/cashier staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
4.9
6.1
3.8
5.0
4.9
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
11.3
12.3
10.8
5.0
11.9
12.5
Moderately Responsive
55.0
52.6
56.3
67.5
54.5
31.3
Very Responsive
28.8
28.9
29.1
22.5
28.7
56.3

Only 178 graduating seniors reported contact with the Counseling center staff, and the staff was rated at least moderately responsive by 84.3% of those respondents (see Table 87). 72.1% (n=459) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 87: Counseling Center Staff

Counseling center staff (%)

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
10.1
10.7
9.7
10.5
10.4
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
5.6
7.1
4.3
0.0
6.5
0.0
Moderately Responsive
38.2
29.8
45.2
31.6
39.6
0.0
Very Responsive
46.1
52.4
40.9
57.9
43.5
100.0

Responsiveness of the Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry staff was rated very high by the 64 graduating seniors who reported contact with the staff; 96.9% of these respondents reported at least moderate responsiveness (see Table 88). 89.5% (n=548) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 88: Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry Staff
Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry staff (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
3.1
5.0
2.3
0.0
3.5
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Moderately Responsive
53.1
35.0
60.5
40.0
54.4
0.0
Very Responsive
43.8
60.0
37.2
60.0
42.1
100.0

Registration and Records staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 88.2% of the 670 graduating senior respondents (see Table 89).

Table 89: Registration and Records Staff
Registration and Records staff (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
3.4
4.4
2.7
2.2
3.7
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
8.4
8.4
7.9
2.2
8.7
5.0
Moderately Responsive
50.9
49.0
52.6
55.6
50.8
45.0
Very Responsive
37.3
38.2
36.9
40.0
36.8
50.0

Internships, co-ops, field experiences, practica staff were rated at least moderately responsive by 86.8% of the 317 graduating senior respondents (see Table 90). 51.2% (n=332) of the survey respondents reported no contact with staff in this area.

Table 90: Internships, Co-ops, Field Experiences, Practica Staff
Internships, co-ops, field experiences, practica staff (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Very Unresponsive
5.7
4.0
6.9
0.0
6.4
0.0
Moderately Unresponsive
7.6
4.8
9.5
4.3
7.1
30.0
Moderately Responsive
37.9
33.6
40.2
26.1
38.8
30.0
Very Responsive
48.9
57.6
43.4
69.6
47.7
40.0

The means and standard deviations for Staff Responsiveness are presented in Table 91. The scale used was as follows: 4 = very responsive, 3 = moderately responsive, 2 = moderately unresponsive, and 1 = very unresponsive. Chart 5 presents a summary of the percentages of respondents who rated staff moderately or very responsive.

Table 91: Staff Responsiveness Means and Standard Deviations

Responsiveness of Staff

All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry staffmean:
3.38
3.50
3.33
3.60
3.35
4.00
sd:
0.65
0.76
0.61
0.55
0.67
0.00
Internships/co-ops/field experiences/practica staffmean:
3.30
3.45
3.20
3.65
3.28
3.10
sd:
0.84
0.77
0.88
0.57
0.85
0.88
Career services staff mean:
3.29
3.37
3.22
3.27
3.28
3.50
sd:
0.78
0.79
0.77
0.77
0.79
0.79
Library staff mean:
3.28
3.27
3.29
3.24
3.27
3.43
sd:
0.73
0.77
0.69
0.77
0.73
0.68
Registration process staff mean:
3.23
3.27
3.20
3.51
3.21
3.22
sd:
0.70
0.74
0.67
0.63
0.70
0.73
Campus-sponsored recreational staffmean:
3.22
3.27
3.18
3.28
3.20
3.44
sd:
0.66
0.64
0.67
0.54
0.66
0.73
Registration and Records staffmean:
3.22
3.21
3.24
3.33
3.21
3.45
sd:
0.74
0.77
0.71
0.64
0.75
0.60
Counseling center staff mean:
3.20
3.24
3.17
3.37
3.16
4.00
sd:
0.94
0.99
0.90
0.96
0.95
0.00
Student health services staffmean:
3.19
3.13
3.24
3.40
3.17
3.18
sd:
0.82
0.85
0.80
0.70
0.84
0.73
Bookstore staff mean:
3.12
3.17
3.08
3.14
3.12
3.05
sd:
0.70
0.70
0.69
0.64
0.70
0.85
Business office/cashier staff mean:
3.08
3.04
3.11
3.08
3.07
3.44
sd:
0.77
0.81
0.74
0.69
0.77
0.73
Computer lab/centermean:
3.01
3.08
2.96
3.32
2.97
3.47
sd:
0.82
0.78
0.85
0.71
0.83
0.70
Residence halls staff mean:
2.89
2.91
2.86
3.00
2.87
2.88
sd:
0.85
0.84
0.85
0.85
0.84
0.93
Financial Aid staff mean:
2.66
2.58
2.72
2.61
2.66
3.00
sd:
1.01
1.04
0.98
1.02
1.01
1.04
Food service staff mean:
2.64
2.63
2.64
2.66
2.64
2.50
sd:
0.88
0.88
0.88
0.94
0.87
0.97

Chart 5: Staff Responsiveness

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OUTCOMES OF GENERAL EDUCATION

This section provides ratings of how much respondents felt their education at NC State has contributed to global growth needs, general education, and knowledge, skills, and personal development.

Global Growth Needs

The ratings of how well NC State met respondents' needs in the area of intellectual growth are displayed in Table 92. The majority (94.7%) of all graduating senior respondents felt that NC State at least adequately met their needs. No differences in response were found to be significant by gender or ethnicity.

Table 92: Intellectual Growth Needs Met
Intellectual growth needs met (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Poorly
0.3
0.0
0.5
1.6
0.2
0.0
Somewhat Adequately
5.0
5.2
5.0
12.9
4.6
2.9
Adequately
40.1
37.0
42.4
41.9
39.8
45.7
Very Well
54.6
57.8
52.2
43.5
55.4
51.4

Respondents were also positive in the area of career training, with 74.9% reporting that NC State was at least adequate in meeting their career training growth needs. These frequencies are presented in Table 93.

Table 93: Career Training Growth Needs Met
Career training growth needs met (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Poorly
5.0
5.1
5.0
9.7
4.8
2.9
Somewhat Adequately
20.2
22.7
18.5
25.8
20.0
17.1
Adequately
46.9
47.0
47.0
46.8
46.7
54.3
Very Well
28.0
25.2
29.5
17.7
28.4
25.7

NC State was seen as at least adequately meeting personal growth needs by 87.0% of all respondents. These results are displayed in Table 94.

Table 94: Personal Growth Needs Met
Personal growth needs met (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Poorly
2.5
2.1
2.8
8.1
2.2
2.9
Somewhat Adequately
10.5
9.9
11.0
17.7
10.1
8.6
Adequately
44.0
43.1
44.6
37.1
44.0
54.3
Very Well
43.0
44.9
41.6
37.1
43.7
34.3

General Education

Most graduating seniors indicated that their coursework at NC State taught them how to find and access needed information, with 91.1% of respondents reporting agreement with this statement (see Table 95).

Table 95: Coursework Taught how to Find Information
Coursework taught how to find and access needed information (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.0
0.6
2.9
Tend to Disagree
2.8
4.0
1.8
3.3
2.7
2.9
Neither A/D
5.5
3.8
6.7
6.6
5.4
5.7
Tend to Agree
50.7
49.1
52.1
36.1
52.0
45.7
Agree
40.4
42.5
38.7
54.1
39.2
42.9

Seniors also reported that their coursework at NC State has increased their ability to develop creative solutions in the process of problem solving, with 88.4% of respondents indicating agreement with this statement. These results are shown in Table 96 .

Table 96: Coursework Increased Ability to Solve Problems
Coursework increased ability to creatively solve problems (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree
0.6
0.5
0.7
0.0
0.6
0.0
Tend to Disagree
3.1
4.7
2.0
6.5
3.0
0.0
Neither A/D
7.9
9.4
6.9
16.1
7.2
11.4
Tend to Agree
42.3
41.5
42.6
33.9
42.3
51.4
Agree
46.1
44.0
47.8
43.5
46.8
37.1

Approximately three-fourths of respondents reported making new friends with people from different countries or different cultural backgrounds while at NC State, with 72.6% indicating agreement with this statement (see Table 97).

Table 97: Diverse Friends
Made diverse friends while at NC State (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree
4.9
5.7
4.4
5.0
4.9
6.1
Tend to Disagree
8.6
9.9
7.7
5.0
9.1
3.0
Neither A/D
13.9
13.2
14.2
6.7
14.3
12.1
Tend to Agree
28.4
26.7
29.7
21.7
29.1
24.2
Agree
44.2
44.4
43.9
61.7
42.6
54.5

Of the 477 respondents who reported taking foreign language classes at NC State, 58.2% stated that those classes were helpful in gaining appreciation of other cultures (see Table 98).

Table 98: Foreign Language Course Helped Cultural Appreciation
Foreign language course helped cultural appreciation (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Disagree
6.0
4.0
8.5
7.1
6.0
5.9
Tend to Disagree
8.9
10.3
7.1
7.1
9.3
0.0
Neither A/D
26.8
26.5
27.7
31.0
26.1
41.2
Tend to Agree
32.4
30.0
34.4
31.0
31.8
41.2
Agree
25.8
29.2
22.3
23.8
26.8
11.8

In the first of two literacy measures, graduating seniors reported some interest in current events, with 86.6% of respondents indicating that they read newspapers or news magazines at least three times a month. Chi-square significant differences in response were found by gender (p = 0.001), with more males (90.3%) than females (81.5%) reporting reading the news at least three times a month. See Table 99 for these results.

Table 99: How Often Read the News
How often read newspapers and news magazines (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
More than 3 times/week
36.5
23.4
45.9
21.0
37.1
48.6
1 - 3 times/week
34.4
36.4
32.9
29.0
35.1
25.7
1 - 3 times/month
15.7
21.7
11.5
32.3
14.5
20.0
Less than once a month
2.9
3.7
2.2
6.5
2.7
0.0
Seldom
9.4
12.9
7.0
11.3
9.5
5.7
Not at all
1.1
1.9
0.5
0.0
1.2
0.0
Gender: p < 0.001

In the second of two literacy measures, respondents indicated that leisure reading was less common than reading for news, with 67.0% of respondents reporting doing leisure reading more than three times a month or more. This result is displayed in Table 100.

Table 100: How Often Read for Leisure

How often read for leisure (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
More than 3 times/week
21.4
21.3
21.3
21.3
21.6
14.3
1 - 3 times/week
22.9
22.5
23.2
9.8
23.7
25.7
3 times/month
22.7
24.2
21.7
27.9
22.4
22.9
Less than once a month
10.1
12.1
8.7
9.8
10.1
11.4
Seldom
19.3
17.8
20.5
27.9
18.8
20.0
Not at all
3.6
2.1
4.6
3.3
3.5
5.7

Knowledge, Skills, and Personal Development

Graduating seniors were asked to rate the extent to which they perceived their college education had contributed to 23 knowledge, skills, and personal development areas. For each question, significant differences in response by gender (T-tests) or ethnicity (ANOVA) are reported when found. At the end of this subsection, means and standard deviations are presented.

Respondents reported the highest levels of collegiate educational contribution in technical skills development areas such as ability to plan and carry out projects independently, ability to critically analyze ideas and information, and enhancing analytic skills. Lower levels of collegiate educational contribution were indicated in development of attitudes and values, with the lowest being exercising public responsibility and community service and advancing your appreciation of the arts.

Most graduating seniors felt that their university education had a beneficial effect on the development of their writing skills, with 84.8% of respondents indicating that NC State had made at least somewhat of a contribution (see Table 101).

Table 101: College Contribution to Writing Skills

Writing skills (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.9
1.7
2.0
0.0
2.1
0.0
Very Little
13.3
12.4
14.1
9.8
13.8
8.6
Somewhat
48.5
48.9
48.0
41.0
48.3
62.9
Very Much
36.3
37.1
35.9
49.2
35.8
28.6

The ratings of how much seniors perceived their speaking skills to be influenced by their university education are presented below in Table 82. This is another area in which respondents reported a strong educational contribution, with 84.2% stating that their education had contributed either somewhat or very much to the development of these skills (see Table 102).

Table 102: College Contribution to Speaking Skills

Speaking skills (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
2.6
3.1
2.2
1.6
2.7
0.0
Very Little
13.2
15.2
12.0
17.7
13.0
14.7
Somewhat
44.8
42.6
46.3
38.7
45.1
47.1
Very Much
39.4
39.0
39.6
41.9
39.2
38.2

The majority of respondents felt their comprehension skills had been developed through their experience at NC State, with 88.1% reporting at least somewhat of a contribution. This result is displayed in Table 103.

Table 103: College Contribution to Comprehension Skills

Comprehension skills (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.3
0.9
1.5
0.0
1.3
2.9
Very Little
10.7
13.5
8.8
22.6
10.1
5.7
Somewhat
49.5
46.2
51.7
29.0
50.3
62.9
Very Much
38.6
39.3
38.0
48.4
38.3
28.6

Ratings on gains in mathematics skills (Table 104) were similarly high, with 84.0% reporting at least somewhat of a contribution from their NC State education. There was a significant difference in response by gender (p = 0.0001), with 89.6% of male respondents indicating at least somewhat of a contribution, and only 76.0% of female respondents indicating at least somewhat of a contribution.

Table 104: College Contribution to Using Mathematics Skills
Using mathematics skills (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
2.8
4.3
1.7
1.6
2.7
5.9
Very Little
13.3
19.6
8.7
16.4
13.1
11.8
Somewhat
36.5
38.0
35.2
45.9
35.6
41.2
Very Much
47.5
38.0
54.4
36.1
48.6
41.2

Gender: p < 0.001

NC State was also seen as having made a definite contribution to applying scientific methods of inquiry, with 87.8% of respondents reporting at least somewhat of a contribution. Responses were found to be significantly different by gender (p = 0.0001), with 91.1% of males indicating somewhat to very much of a contribution from their education, and 82.7% of females indicating somewhat to very much of an educational contribution (see Table 105).

Table 105: College Contribution to Applying Scientific Methods of Inquiry
Applying scientific methods of inquiry (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.9
2.7
1.4
0.0
1.9
5.7
Very Little
10.4
14.6
7.5
18.3
9.9
8.6
Somewhat
37.0
38.3
35.8
38.3
36.8
34.3
Very Much
50.8
44.4
55.3
43.3
51.3
51.4

Gender: p < 0.001

As displayed in Table 106, the strongest area of educational contribution to skills development was seen in the area of enhancing analytic skills. A great majority of respondents (93.0%) stated that their education at NC State made at least somewhat of a contribution to the development of these skills.

Table 106: College Contribution to Enhancing Analytic Skills
Enhancing analytic skills (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.5
1.7
1.4
3.2
1.4
0.0
Very Little
5.5
7.7
4.1
9.7
5.3
5.7
Somewhat
37.4
38.0
36.7
46.8
35.9
54.3
Very Much
55.6
52.6
57.9
40.3
57.4
40.0

When asked about the contribution of their university education to the development of computer skills, 87.2% of respondents replied that they felt NC State had made at least somewhat of a contribution to the development of these skills (see Table 107).

Table 107: College Contribution to Developing Computer Skills
Developing computer skills (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
2.4
3.3
1.5
0.0
2.3
5.7
Very Little
10.5
11.2
10.2
21.3
9.7
14.3
Somewhat
31.3
33.3
29.6
24.6
31.9
22.9
Very Much
55.9
52.3
58.7
54.1
56.1
57.1

The ratings of NC State's educational contribution to developing a tolerance for divergent views are presented below in Table 108. More than three-quarters of all respondents (78.3%) stated at least somewhat of an educational contribution to developing a tolerance for divergent views. No significant differences in response were observed by gender or ethnicity.

Table 108: College Contribution to Developing A Tolerance for Divergent Views
Developing a tolerance for divergent views (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
4.7
3.2
5.7
4.9
4.6
5.7
Very Little
17.0
16.0
17.4
21.3
16.8
11.4
Somewhat
46.8
45.7
47.7
37.7
47.2
54.3
Very Much
31.5
35.1
29.1
36.1
31.4
28.6

The extent to which NC State contributed to respondents' understanding of diverse cultures and values is displayed in Table 109. More than two thirds of all respondents (70.7%) reported at least somewhat of an educational contribution to their understanding of diverse cultures and values. Significant differences were observed by gender (p = 0.005), with 74.4% of female respondents seeing somewhat to very much of a contribution and only 68.1% of male respondents seeing somewhat to very much of a contribution.

Table 109: College Contribution to Understanding Diverse Cultures and Values
Understanding diverse cultures and values (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
5.3
3.4
6.7
8.3
5.1
6.1
Very Little
23.9
22.2
25.2
26.7
23.9
21.2
Somewhat
44.1
44.6
43.9
36.7
45.0
36.4
Very Much
26.6
29.8
24.2
28.3
26.0
36.4

Gender: p < 0.01

Graduating seniors' ratings of how much their university education contributed to their appreciation of racial and sexual equality are presented in Table 110. 62.0% of all respondents reported that their education at NC State had at least somewhat of a positive effect in this area. No significant differences in response to this question were observed by gender or by ethnicity.

Table 110: College Contribution to Appreciating Racial and Sexual Equality
Appreciating racial and sexual equality (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
10.7
9.9
11.3
13.6
10.4
14.7
Very Little
27.3
23.6
30.0
33.9
27.4
14.7
Somewhat
41.8
43.6
40.6
35.6
42.2
44.1
Very Much
20.2
22.9
18.0
16.9
20.0
26.5

When rating the extent to which their college education contributed to their ability to work with people from diverse backgrounds, 83.7% of graduating seniors reported that their university education had influenced their ability in this area at least somewhat. These frequencies are shown in Table 111.

Table 111: College Contribution to Ability to Work with Diverse Backgrounds
Ability to work with diverse backgrounds (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
3.2
3.1
3.3
6.7
2.9
5.9
Very Little
13.2
12.0
13.9
20.0
12.9
5.9
Somewhat
44.2
43.4
44.8
30.0
45.3
41.2
Very Much
39.5
41.4
38.0
43.3
38.9
47.1

As presented in Table 112, almost three quarters (72.5%) of all respondents indicated that their education at NC State had contributed to their ability to recognize and act upon ethical principles in the range between somewhat and very much.

Table 112: College Contribution to Ability to Recognize and Act upon Ethical Principles
Ability to recognize and act upon ethical principles (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
6.4
6.2
6.7
11.5
6.1
5.9
Very Little
21.1
21.0
21.2
27.9
20.8
17.6
Somewhat
45.8
42.7
48.2
36.1
46.8
41.2
Very Much
26.7
30.1
24.0
24.6
26.3
35.3

In the related area of exercising public responsibility and community service, graduating seniors indicated that their ability in this area had been developed through their educational experiences at NC State, with 54.1% of all respondents reporting at least somewhat of an educational contribution (see Table 113).

Table 113: College Contribution to Exercising Public Responsibility and Community Service
Exercising public responsibility and community service (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
10.6
10.9
10.5
10.5
10.9
6.1
Very Little
35.3
31.3
38.1
33.3
35.6
30.3
Somewhat
37.8
39.6
36.6
29.8
38.2
42.4
Very Much
16.3
18.2
14.8
26.3
15.4
21.2

Slightly less than half of graduating seniors indicated that their university education was important in advancing their appreciation of the arts, with 49.3% reporting at least somewhat of an educational contribution to their development in this area. This result is displayed in Table 114.

Table 114: College Contribution to Advancing Appreciation of the Arts
Advancing your appreciation of the arts (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
16.5
15.2
17.6
15.8
16.8
12.1
Very Little
34.1
31.9
36.0
24.6
34.9
33.3
Somewhat
31.0
33.1
29.4
35.1
30.5
36.4
Very Much
18.3
19.9
17.0
24.6
17.8
18.2

When asked to evaluate the amount that their college education had contributed to their understanding of issues and problems facing the world, 69.0% of graduating seniors reported that their education had made at least somewhat of a contribution in this area (see Table 115).

Table 115: College Contribution to Understanding Issues/Problems Facing the World
Understanding issues/problems facing the world (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
6.6
5.8
7.3
8.2
6.6
5.7
Very Little
24.3
24.6
24.4
11.5
25.1
31.4
Somewhat
45.5
43.9
46.8
52.5
45.0
48.6
Very Much
23.5
25.8
21.6
27.9
23.4
14.3

Percentages for educational contribution to understanding the present as it relates to history are given in Table 116. 67.9% of all respondents stated that their understanding of the present as it relates to history had been at least somewhat influenced through their education at NC State.

Table 116: College Contribution to Understanding the Present as Relates to History
Understanding the present as relates to history (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
7.0
9.1
5.6
5.2
7.1
9.1
Very Little
25.1
25.0
25.4
29.3
24.7
30.3
Somewhat
45.8
44.9
46.3
34.5
46.8
36.4
Very Much
22.1
21.1
22.7
31.0
21.4
24.2

In the area of understanding how science and technology influence life, most respondents (88.2%) reported that they felt the contribution from their university education ranged from somewhat to very much. This result is displayed in Table 117.

Table 117: College Contribution to Understanding How Science and Technology Influence Life
Understanding how science and technology influence life (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.4
2.2
0.9
3.3
1.3
0.0
Very Little
10.4
11.0
9.8
13.3
9.5
25.7
Somewhat
41.3
41.3
41.1
43.3
41.1
40.0
Very Much
46.9
45.5
48.2
40.0
48.0
34.3

As presented in Table 118, another strong area of educational contribution was seen in the ability to critically analyze ideas and information. 94.3% of all graduating senior respondents indicated at least somewhat of a contribution from their NC State education in this area.

Table 118: College Contribution to Ability to Critically Analyze Ideas and Information
Ability to critically analyze ideas and information (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
0.9
1.0
0.9
3.3
0.8
0.0
Very Little
4.8
5.1
4.6
5.0
4.8
5.9
Somewhat
40.6
41.1
40.1
46.7
40.0
44.1
Very Much
53.7
52.8
54.5
45.0
54.5
50.0

The ability to lead or guide others was seen as having been at least somewhat developed through the NC State experience by 85.6% of all respondents (see Table 119).

Table 119: College Contribution to Ability to Lead or Guide Others
Ability to lead or guide others (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
2.2
2.4
2.1
3.3
2.1
2.9
Very Little
12.2
11.8
12.5
23.0
11.3
17.6
Somewhat
43.7
39.9
46.5
32.8
44.8
35.3
Very Much
41.9
45.9
38.9
41.0
41.8
44.1

As displayed in Table 120, most respondents (90.4%) reported that NC State had made at least somewhat of a contribution to the development of their ability to function as part of a team.

Table 120: College Contribution to Ability to Function as Part of a Team
Ability to function as part of a team (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.3
0.7
1.7
1.6
1.2
2.9
Very Little
8.2
8.1
8.2
14.8
7.9
2.9
Somewhat
38.2
36.3
39.8
31.1
38.6
42.9
Very Much
52.2
54.9
50.3
52.5
52.2
51.4

The majority of graduating seniors felt that their ability to carry out projects independently was developed at least in part by their education at NC State, with 94.4% stating at least somewhat of an educational contribution (see Table 121).

Table 121: College Contribution to Ability to Plan and Carry Out Projects Independently
Ability to plan and carry out projects independently (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
1.2
0.7
1.5
1.7
1.2
0.0
Very Little
4.5
5.3
3.9
8.3
3.8
17.1
Somewhat
39.4
35.2
42.5
38.3
40.0
28.6
Very Much
55.0
58.8
52.0
51.7
55.1
54.3

When asked about the extent to which their university education had contributed to their appreciation of learning as a lifelong process, 89.1% of graduating seniors felt that the NC State experience had made at least somewhat of a contribution in this area. Significant differences were observed by gender (p = 0.003), with 90.5% of female respondents reporting at least somewhat of a contribution and 87.9% of male respondents reporting at least somewhat of a contribution. These results are contained in Table 122.

Table 122: College Contribution to Valuing Learning as a Lifelong Process
Valuing learning as a lifelong process (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
2.9
2.7
3.1
5.0
2.7
6.1
Very Little
8.0
6.8
9.0
6.7
8.0
12.1
Somewhat
37.9
32.9
41.5
46.7
37.3
39.4
Very Much
51.2
57.6
46.4
41.7
52.0
42.4
Gender: p < 0.01

Commitment to personal health and fitness was seen as being at least somewhat influenced by their education at NC State by 69.7% of all respondents. See Table 123 for display of this result.

Table 123: College Contribution to Commitment to Personal Health and Fitness
Commitment to personal health and fitness (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Not at all
7.4
7.8
7.0
4.9
7.6
5.7
Very Little
23.0
20.7
24.8
13.1
23.9
20.0
Somewhat
41.4
41.1
41.5
49.2
40.9
40.0
Very Much
28.3
30.4
26.7
32.8
27.7
34.3

Means and Standard Deviations

Means and standard deviations for global questions on overall growth and gains realized through the collegiate experience, ranked from highest to lowest for the total group, are displayed in Table 124. The scale used was: 4 = very well, 3 = adequately, 2 = somewhat adequately, and 1 = poorly.

Table 124: Global Growth Needs

Growth Needs

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Intellectual growth needs metmean:
3.49
3.53
3.46
3.27
3.50
3.49
sd:
0.61
0.59
0.62
0.75
0.60
0.56
Personal growth needs metmean:
3.27
3.31
3.25
3.03
3.29
3.20
sd:
0.75
0.73
0.76
0.94
0.73
0.72
Career training needs metmean:
2.98
2.92
3.01
2.73
2.99
3.03
sd:
0.83
0.82
0.82
0.87
0.82
0.75

Means and standard deviations for general education, also ranked from highest to lowest for the total group, are presented in Table 125. The scale used was: 5 = agree, 4 = tend to agree, 3 = neither agree nor disagree, 2 = tend to disagree, and 1 = disagree. The means for these questions were calculated with "no opinion" responses omitted.

Table 125: Areas of General Education

Area of General Growth

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Coursework taught how to find informationmean:
4.26
4.27
4.25
4.34
4.25
4.23
sd:
0.79
0.83
0.76
0.94
0.77
0.91
Coursework increased ability to solve problemsmean:
4.30
4.24
4.34
4.15
4.31
4.26
sd:
0.80
0.84
0.77
0.92
0.80
0.66
Made diverse friendsmean:
3.92
3.92
3.92
4.30
3.89
4.06
sd:
1.27
1.26
1.27
1.12
1.27
1.35
Foreign language course helped cultural appreciationmean:
3.58
3.69
3.46
3.57
3.58
3.53
sd:
1.21
1.14
1.28
1.15
1.23
0.94

The ranked means and standard deviations for respondent estimates of gains in knowledge, skills, and personal development are given in Table 126. The scale used was: 4 = very much, 3 = somewhat, 2 = very little, and 1 = not at all. Quite notable is that the seven lowest-ranked items are concerned with diversity/globalization issues or with those outcomes traditionally associated with a liberal arts education.

Table 126: Knowledge, Skills, and Personal Development
Knowledge, skills, and personal development
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Ability to plan and carry out projects independentlymean:
3.48
3.52
3.45
3.40
3.49
3.37
sd:
0.64
0.63
0.65
0.72
0.63
0.77
Ability to critically analyze ideas and informationmean:
3.47
3.46
3.48
3.33
3.48
3.44
sd:
0.63
0.64
0.63
0.73
0.63
0.61
Enhancing analytic skills mean:
3.47
3.42
3.51
3.24
3.49
3.34
sd:
0.67
0.71
0.64
0.76
0.66
0.59
Ability to function as part of a teammean:
3.41
3.45
3.39
3.34
3.42
3.43
sd:
0.70
0.67
0.71
0.79
0.69
0.70
Developing computer skills mean:
3.41
3.34
3.46
3.33
3.42
3.31
sd:
0.77
0.81
0.74
0.81
0.76
0.93
Applying scientific methods of inquirymean:
3.37
3.24
3.45
3.25
3.38
3.31
sd:
0.74
0.80
0.69
0.75
0.74
0.87
Appreciating learning as a lifelong processmean:
3.37
3.46
3.31
3.25
3.39
3.18
sd:
0.75
0.74
0.76
0.79
0.75
0.88
Understanding how science and technology influence lifemean:
3.34
3.30
3.37
3.20
3.36
3.09
sd:
0.72
0.75
0.69
0.80
0.71
0.78
Using mathematics skills mean:
3.29
3.10
3.42
3.16
3.30
3.18
sd:
0.80
0.86
0.72
0.76
0.80
0.87
Comprehension skills mean:
3.25
3.24
3.26
3.26
3.26
3.17
sd:
0.69
0.71
0.68
0.81
0.69
0.66
Ability to lead or guide others mean:
3.25
3.29
3.22
3.11
3.26
3.21
sd:
0.75
0.77
0.74
0.88
0.74
0.84
Speaking skills mean:
3.21
3.18
3.23
3.21
3.21
3.24
sd:
0.76
0.80
0.74
0.79
0.77
0.70
Ability to work with diverse backgroundsmean:
3.20
3.23
3.18
3.10
3.20
3.29
sd:
0.78
0.78
0.79
0.95
0.77
0.84
Writing skills mean:
3.19
3.21
3.18
3.39
3.18
3.20
sd:
0.73
0.72
0.74
0.67
0.74
0.58
Developing a tolerance for divergent viewsmean:
3.05
3.13
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.06
sd:
0.82
0.79
0.83
0.88
0.82
0.80
Recognizing and acting upon ethical principlesmean:
2.93
2.97
2.89
2.74
2.93
3.06
sd:
0.85
0.87
0.84
0.96
0.84
0.89
Understanding diverse cultures and valuesmean:
2.92
3.01
2.85
2.85
2.92
3.03
sd:
0.84
0.81
0.86
0.94
0.84
0.92
Commitment to personal health and fitnessmean:
2.91
2.94
2.88
3.10
2.89
3.03
sd:
0.89
0.91
0.88
0.81
0.90
0.89
Understand issues and problems facing the worldmean:
2.86
2.90
2.83
3.00
2.85
2.71
sd:
0.85
0.85
0.85
0.86
0.85
0.79
Understanding the present as relates to historymean:
2.83
2.78
2.86
2.91
2.82
2.76
sd:
0.85
0.88
0.83
0.90
0.85
0.94
Appreciating racial and sexual equalitymean:
2.72
2.80
2.65
2.56
2.72
2.82
sd:
0.91
0.91
0.90
0.93
0.90
1.00
Exercising public responsibility and community servicemean:
2.60
2.65
2.56
2.72
2.58
2.79
sd:
0.88
0.90
0.87
0.98
0.88
0.86
Advancing your appreciation of the artsmean:
2.51
2.58
2.46
2.68
2.49
2.61
sd:
0.97
0.97
0.97
1.02
0.97
0.93

Percentage rankings of respondents who reported at least somewhat of a contribution from their NC State education to knowledge and skills development are displayed in Chart 6. It is important to note that these percentages were calculated excluding "don't know" responses.

Chart 6: Contribution of NC State Education to Technical Skills Development

Percentage rankings of respondents who reported at least somewhat of a contribution from their NC State education to development of attitudes and values are presented in Chart 7. These percentages were also calculated excluding "don't know" responses. Interesting to note is how much lower the perceived contribution to attitudes and values was overall than the perceived contribution to knowledge and skills development.

Chart 7: Contribution of NC State Education to Attitudes and Values

Percentage rankings of respondents who reported at least somewhat of a contribution from their NC State education to the realization of educational goals are presented in Chart 8. Again, these percentages were calculated excluding "don't know" responses. The area in which graduating seniors reported the highest educational contribution was ability to plan/carry out projects independently, with 94.4% reporting at least somewhat of a contribution. The lowest reported area of educational contribution was understanding the present as relates to history, with 67.9% of respondents indicating at least somewhat of a contribution in this area.

Chart 8: Contribution of NC State Education to Established Goals for Undergraduate Education

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TIME TO DEGREE COMPLETION

This section presents responses to the question of time spent to acquire a degree at NC State, reasons for taking less than 15 hours, and reasons for taking more than 8 semesters to graduate. For each question, Chi-Square significant differences in response by gender or ethnicity are reported when found. Selected questions are also analyzed by entry status.

The majority of graduating seniors spent their entire college career at NC State, with 75.7% of respondents reporting freshman entry and 24.3% reporting transfer entry (see Table 127).

Table 127: Entered as Freshman vs. Transfer
Entered as freshman vs. transfer (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Freshman
75.7
73.1
77.8
88.5
74.8
80.0
Transfer
24.3
26.9
22.2
11.5
25.2
20.0

87.9% of the respondents reported taking fewer than 15 credit hours during at least one semester. Significantly more male respondents (90.6%) than female respondents (83.9%) answered yes to this question (p = 0.001). These results are displayed in Table 128.

Table 128: Fewer than Fifteen Credit Hours
Ever took fewer than 15 credit hours (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Freshman Entry
Transfer Entry
Yes
87.9
83.9
90.6
85.2
88.1
85.3
87.3
89.3
No
12.1
16.1
9.4
14.8
11.9
14.7
12.7
10.7
Gender: p < 0.001

The reasons given by respondents for taking fewer than fifteen credit hours are listed below in Table 129. It should be noted that respondents could choose more than one reason. The top four reasons are as follows: 36.1% of all respondents reported needing to work; 27.0% of all respondents indicated that they were finishing their degree and did not need more hours; 11.5% stated that they wanted to make better grades; and 10.6% stated the reason was due to the fact that courses they wanted were not available. Chi-Square analysis for significant differences could not be used for this question.

Table 129: Reasons for Taking Fewer than Fifteen Credit Hours
Reasons for taking fewer than fifteen credit hours (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
Freshman Entry
Transfer Entry
Needed to work
36.1
35.6
36.1
42.3
35.8
26.7
32.6
47.3
Completing degree-did not need more hours
27.0
30.0
25.0
9.6
28.0
30.0
28.1
23.9
Wanted to make better grades
11.5
9.4
12.9
11.5
11.1
23.3
12.3
8.6
Courses wanted were not available
10.6
10.6
10.7
19.2
10.1
10.0
10.6
10.4
Combination of courses too much
5.4
5.0
5.7
7.7
5.4
3.3
6.2
3.2
Other reasons
5.4
5.8
5.2
3.8
5.7
0.0
5.8
3.6
Participated in an internship, co-op, etc.
2.0
1.7
2.2
1.9
2.1
0.0
2.7
0.0
Was advised to carry lighter load
1.5
1.1
1.8
3.8
1.2
6.7
1.5
1.8
Family responsibilities
0.6
0.8
0.4
0.0
0.6
0.0
0.3
1.4

Approximately three quarters of those respondents who indicated taking fewer than 15 hours in a semester took close to a full course load, with 76.8% reporting a course load between 12 and 14 credit hours (see Table 130).

Table 130: Credit Hours Taken if Fewer than Fifteen
Credit hours taken if less than 15 (%)
All

Female

Male
African- American

White
Other Minorities
12 - 14 Hours
76.8
79.4
75.4
85.7
76.3
82.1
10 - 11 Hours
6.1
4.4
7.3
2.0
6.6
0.0
< 10 Hours
17.1
16.3
17.3
12.2
17.1
17.9

The percentage of all seniors who reported taking more than eight semesters to graduate is displayed in Table 131. 41.3% of all respondents took more than eight semesters to complete their studies at NC State. Significant differences in response were found by ethnicity (p = 0.009), with 59.7% of African-Americans taking more than eight semesters, while only 40.0% of whites and 37.1% of other ethnic minorities indicating the same answer. Significantly (p = 0.001) more males (50.8%) than females (27.6%) took more than eight semesters.

Table 131: More than Eight Semesters to Graduate
More than 8 semesters to complete (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Yes
41.3
27.6
50.8
59.7
40.0
37.1
No/missing
58.7
72.4
49.2
40.3
60.0
62.9
Gender: p < 0.001; Ethnicity: p < 0.01

Of the 426 respondents who indicated taking more than eight semesters to complete their degree program, 349 listed a primary reason for this occurrence. The most frequently cited responses, as displayed in Table 132, were as follows: 22.9% reported changing their major field of study; 12.9% reported that it was due to having to work while enrolled in school; 11.2% reported that it was due to having a double major, second major, or co-major; and 10.0 % reported that their program included an internship, practicum, student teaching, co-op, and/or international study. Chi-Square analysis for significant differences could not be used for this question.

Table 132: Primary Reason for Taking More than Eight Semesters to Graduate
Primary reason took more than 8 semesters (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Changed major
22.9
21.5
23.3
37.5
22.0
11.1
Had to work while enrolled in school
12.9
8.6
14.2
8.3
13.4
0.0
Double major/second major/co-major
11.2
14.0
10.3
8.3
11.2
22.2
Program included an internship, practicum, student teaching, cooperative education, and/or international study


10.0



7.5



11.1



4.2



9.6



44.4
Repeated courses to improve grades
8.3
10.8
7.5
16.7
7.7
11.1
Program took longer that 4 years to complete
4.6

3.2

5.1

4.2

4.8


0.0
Took fewer hours per semester to improve GPA
4.3

3.2

4.7

4.2

4.5


0.0
Other academic reasons
4.3
5.4
4.0
4.2
4.5
0.0
Poor academic advising
3.7
3.2
3.6
0.0
3.8
0.0
Hours required in major above average
3.2

4.3

2.8

4.2

3.2


0.0
Other personal reasons
3.2
5.4
2.4
4.2
3.2
0.0
Courses needed were not always available
2.9

2.2

3.2

0.0

3.2


0.0
Lost credits from transfer institution
2.0
3.2
1.6
4.2
1.9
0.0
Stopped out completely to earn money
2.0

2.2

2.0

0.0

1.9

11.1
Could not meet GPA requirements for major
1.4

2.2

1.2

0.0

1.6


0.0
Unable to handle heavier academic load
1.4

0.0

2.0

0.0

1.6


0.0
Family responsibilities
1.1
3.2
0.4
0.0
1.3
0.0
Academic suspension
0.6
0.0
0.8
0.0
0.6
0.0

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EMPLOYMENT AND INTERNSHIPS AT NC STATE

Information relating to work during the academic year while at NC State is presented in this section. Included are such areas of interest as time spent working during the academic year, relationship between job as a student and major field of study, reason(s) for working, and participation in the co-op program. For each question, Chi-Square significant differences in response by gender or ethnicity are reported when found.

Notably, 805 of the 1,044 respondents (77.1%) reported working during the school year. Of those graduating seniors who reported working during the school year, the majority (90.7%) indicated working less than 35 hours per week (see Table 133). Significant differences were observed between those respondents who entered the University as freshmen and those who entered as transfers (p = 0.001), with 17.1% of transfer entry respondents reporting working forty or more hours per week and only 7.1% of freshman entry respondents reporting working forty or more hours per week.

Table 133: Average Hours Worked Per Week While at NC State
Avg. hrs worked/week while at NC State (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Freshman
Entry
Transfer
Entry
35> hours/week
9.3
7.2
10.8
6.1
9.3
13.8
7.1
17.1
21-34 hours/week
28.6
29.3
27.9
30.6
28.8
17.2
27.4
30.6
20< hours/week
62.1
63.5
61.3
63.3
61.9
69.0
65.5
52.3
Entry status: p < 0.001

More than half of graduating seniors who worked during the school year reported some connection between their studies and employment, with 58.2% stating that their job was at least somewhat related to their major field of study (see Table 134). Significantly more males (60.7%) than females (55.3%) reported their job as being at least somewhat related (p = 0.007)

Table 134: School-Year Job Related to Major
School-year job related to major (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Directly related
29.1
23.3
33.4
17.0
29.7
31.0
Somewhat related
29.1
32.0
27.3
31.9
29.2
27.6
Not related
41.8
44.8
39.3
51.1
41.1
41.4
Gender: p < 0.01

Table 135 indicates that of the respondents who indicated this employment was not related to their academic major by choice (n = 339), 59.6% stated that this was by their own choice.

Table 135: School-Year Job Not Related
School-year job not related to major by choice (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Yes
59.6
63.9
55.8
65.2
59.5
50.0
No
40.4
36.1
44.2
34.8
40.5
50.0

Of those seniors who reported working during the academic year, the majority (59.0%) reported that basic survival needs or academic expenses were their primary reason for working. See Table 136 for this result.

Table 136: Primary Reason for Working

Primary reason for working (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Basic survival needs
46.5
38.9
52.6
53.5
45.5
62.5
Academic expenses
12.5
14.2
10.8
14.0
11.9
20.8
Lifestyle enhancement
15.4
15.7
15.4
11.6
16.0
8.3
Personal needs/desires
25.6
31.3
21.2
20.9
26.6
8.3

Those respondents who did not indicate basic survival needs as their primary reason for working were split approximately equally into whether these needs were second, third, or fourth in priority (see Table 137).

Table 137: Basic Survival Needs

Basic survival needs (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Second
35.0
34.1
35.7
55.6
33.1
54.5
Third
29.4
28.4
30.8
16.7
30.4
27.3
Fourth
35.6
37.5
33.5
27.8
36.5
18.2

Table 138 displays the frequencies of those respondents who reported that their primary reason for working was not for academic expenses. Almost half (45.2%) of respondents who worked during the academic year ranked payment of academic expenses as their second reason for working.

Table 138: Academic Expenses

Academic expenses (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Second
45.2
38.1
50.3
47.1
44.5
54.5
Third
27.9
28.1
28.0
26.5
28.5
18.2
Fourth
26.9
33.8
21.7
26.5
26.9
27.3

Of those respondents who did not report lifestyle enhancement (e.g., entertainment and travel) as their primary reason for working, 46.9% stated that this reason was of least importance in their decision to work, listing it as the fourth priority (see Table 139).

Table 139: Lifestyle Enhancement

Lifestyle enhancement (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Second
26.4
28.6
24.8
27.5
26.4
26.9
Third
26.7
26.3
27.2
20.0
27.7
19.2
Fourth
46.9
45.1
48.1
52.5
46.0
53.8

As shown in Table 140, of the respondents who did not list personal needs and desires as their primary reason for working, slightly less than half (43.8%) stated that this reason had third priority in their decision to work,

Table 140: Personal Needs and Desires
Personal needs and desires (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Second
33.6
36.4
32.1
30.3
35.0
16.0
Third
43.8
46.8
41.5
57.6
42.3
52.0
Fourth
22.6
16.8
26.4
12.1
22.7
32.0

The picture that emerges through Tables 136-140 is that basic survival needs and academic expenses are a primary motivating factor for the majority of NC State students who work during the academic year.

When asked to estimate the proportion of income during the academic year that was spent on direct expenses (basic survival needs and academic expenses), 60.5 % of the seniors indicated that they spent 50% or more of their income in this manner (see Table 141). Table 142 reveals that 46.2% of respondents indicated that they spent 50% or more of their income from direct employment on personal expenses (lifestyle enhancement and personal needs and desires).

Table 141: Proportion Spent on Direct Expenses
Direct expenses (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Freshman
Entry
Transfer
Entry
0 - 20 percent
22.2
26.4
19.4
14.9
23.7
3.5
24.3
15.3
30 - 40 percent
17.3
18.8
16.2
21.3
17.2
13.8
18.2
15.3
50 - 60 percent
16.7
15.2
18.0
12.8
16.7
24.1
17.7
13.2
70 - 100 percent
43.8
39.7
46.5
51.1
42.4
58.6
39.9
56.1

Table 142: Proportion Spent on Personal Expenses
Personal expenses (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Freshman
Entry
Transfer
Entry
0 - 20 percent
30.7
28.4
32.2
39.3
29.4
44.8
27.3
41.8
30 - 40 percent
23.2
19.4
25.7
17.4
23.2
27.6
23.5
22.0
50 - 60 percent
15.9
15.7
16.0
23.9
15.3
17.2
16.5
14.3
70 - 100 percent
30.3
36.4
26.1
19.6
32.0
10.3
32.8
22.0

Slightly less than one-sixth (n=146) of respondents reported participation in the Cooperative Education (co-op) program (see Table 143).

Table 143: Co-op Participation

Participated in co-op (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Yes
16.3
9.8
21.0
5.9
16.6
25.8
No
83.7
90.2
79.0
94.1
83.4
74.2

Of the students who rated their participation in the co-op program (n = 141), 52.5% stated that the experience was helpful in securing a position of employment after graduation (see Table 144).

Table 144: Value of Co-op Experience
Co-op experience helped in getting employment (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Yes
52.5
40.0
56.6
66.7
51.5
62.5
No
14.9
14.3
15.1
0.0
15.4
12.5
Not sure
7.8
11.4
6.6
0.0
7.7
12.5
Not applicable: no job yet
24.8
34.3
21.7
33.3
25.4
12.5

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PLANS AFTER GRADUATION

This section presents responses dealing with respondents' plans following graduation. This includes employment status, number of graduate programs to which respondents had applied, number of graduate programs into which they had been accepted, and what (if any) graduate or professional programs they plan on attending. This section also reports the nature of respondents' employment following graduation, including information on educational requirements, relationship to degree subject, and salary range. For each question, Chi-Square significant differences in response by gender or ethnicity are reported when found.

Most respondents were planning on embarking on a career, with 17.7% indicating that they had already accepted a position, 4.7% indicating continuation in a current position, and 38.3% indicating that they were still seeking employment. 20.8 % of all respondents reported planning to go on to graduate or professional school either full-time or part-time. These results are displayed in Table 145.

Table 145: Plans Following Graduation

Plans following graduation (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Still seeking employment
38.3
37.9
38.6
39.3
38.5
29.4
Graduate/professional school full-time

18.5

21.4

16.6

26.2

17.8

26.5
Accepted position after graduation
17.7
14.0
20.1
6.6
18.3
17.6
Don't know yet
6.8
7.1
6.6
13.1
6.6
2.9
Other
6.3
8.1
5.1
6.6
6.2
8.8
Continuing in current position
4.7
3.8
5.2
3.3
4.8
2.9
Not seeking employment and not planning to attend school

3.8

3.6

4.1

1.6

4.0

2.9
Graduate/professional school part-time and working part-time

2.3

2.6

2.0

3.3

2.1

5.9
Entering military service
1.6
1.4
1.7
0.0
1.6
2.9

Of those graduating seniors who reported the number of graduate or professional schools to which they had applied (n = 267), 76.4% indicated having applied to between one and four graduate programs. Results are presented in Table 146.

Table 146: Number of Graduate Schools To Which Applied
Number of graduate schools applied to (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
1-2
55.8
48.9
62.5
25.0
60.2
46.2
3-4
20.6
23.7
17.6
21.4
20.4
23.1
> 5
23.6
27.5
19.9
53.6
19.5
30.8

Of those respondents who reported the number of graduate or professional programs into which they had been accepted (n = 158), 90.5% indicated being accepted into between one and four programs. These percentages are presented in Table 147.

Table 147: Number of Graduate Schools To Which Accepted
Number of graduate schools accepted to (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
1-2
74.7
71.2
77.6
54.5
77.0
62.5
3-4
15.8
19.2
12.9
18.2
15.1
25.0
> 5
9.5
9.6
9.4
27.3
7.9
12.5

Of those respondents reporting what type of graduate program they planned on attending (n = 222), the highest percentages were reported in the following distinct fields: 21.2% Engineering; 14.9% Health Professions; and 7.7% Physical or Mathematical Sciences (see Table 148).

Table 148: Type of Graduate Program Attending

Graduate program attending (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Engineering
21.2
7.6
33.3
13.0
20.5
42.9
Health professions
14.9
22.9
7.7
26.1
13.5
14.3
Other
12.6
14.3
11.1
0.0
14.1
14.3
Physical or Mathematical Sciences
7.7
6.7
8.5
4.3
8.6
0.0
Business and Management
6.3
8.6
4.3
8.7
5.9
7.1
Biological Sciences
6.3
5.7
6.8
0.0
7.0
7.1
Agriculture or Natural Resources
5.4
6.7
4.3
4.3
5.9
0.0
Law
5.0
3.8
6.0
13.0
4.3
0.0
Veterinary Medicine
4.1
3.8
4.3
0.0
4.9
0.0
Architecture/Environmental Design
2.7
1.0
4.3
0.0
3.2
0.0
Education
2.7
4.8
0.9
4.3
2.7
0.0
Communications
2.7
4.8
0.9
8.7
2.2
0.0
Humanities
2.3
1.0
3.4
8.7
0.5
14.3
Social Sciences
2.3
3.8
0.9
0.0
2.7
0.0
Textiles
1.8
1.0
2.6
0.0
2.2
0.0
Public Affairs/Services
1.4
2.9
0.0
4.3
1.1
0.0
Computer/Information Sciences
0.9
1.0
0.9
4.3
0.5
0.0

The percentages for relationship of employment to degree subject are displayed in Table 149. The majority of respondents who reported having secured a position by graduation (n=299) were able to find work related to their major field of study, with 91.7% (n=274) reporting that their employment after graduation was at least somewhat related to their degree from NC State.

Table 149: Relationship of Employment to Degree
Employment related to degree (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Directly related
66.6
57.8
70.6
77.8
65.6
72.7
Somewhat related
25.1
29.4
23.2
11.1
25.7
27.3
Not related
8.4
12.7
6.2
11.1
8.7
0.0

The majority of respondents who indicated securing employment after graduation (Table 150) were also able to find full-time work, with 94.2% (n=276) reporting full- time positions.

Table 150: Employment Status After Graduation

Employment status (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Full-Time
94.2
93.9
94.8
100.0
94.8
81.8
Part-Time
5.8
6.1
5.2
0.0
5.2
18.2

As shown in Table 151, most respondents who indicated having secured employment after graduation stated that the nature of their position was permanent (79.6%; n=230).

Table 151: Nature of Employment

Nature of employment (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Permanent
79.6
72.4
83.0
88.9
79.7
63.6
Temporary
20.4
27.6
17.0
11.1
20.3
36.4

A Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science degree was listed as the minimum educational requirement for post-graduation employment by 84.8% of all employed respondents who answered this question (n=299). This result is displayed in Table 152.

Table 152: Minimum Educational Requirements for Position
Minimum education requirements for position (%)
All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Bachelor Degree
84.8
80.6
86.7
88.9
84.2
90.9
Associate/two years of college
7.3
9.2
6.4
11.1
7.1
9.1
Certificate/one year of college
0.7
1.0
0.5
0.0
0.8
0.0
High School Diploma or less
7.3
9.2
6.4
0.0
7.9
0.0

Employed respondents were asked to report their general salary ranges. Table 153 reveals that the salary range reported most frequently was $35,000-$39,999, with a 21.0% response, followed by $40,000-$44,999, with a 17.1% response. While differences were not found to be significant by race or gender, it should be noted that the highest response levels for both females and African Americans were under $25,000. Chart 9 presents the overall percentages for each salary range.

Table 153: Salary Range

Salary range (%)

All

Female

Male
African American

White
Other Minorities
Under $20,000
13.5
21.9
9.3
11.1
13.6
18.2
$20,000-$24,999
14.2
15.6
13.2
33.3
13.6
9.1
$25,000-$29,999
15.7
13.5
16.5
22.2
15.5
9.1
$30,000-$34,999
14.9
14.6
14.8
11.1
15.5
0.0
$35,000-$39,999
21.0
16.7
23.6
0.0
21.7
27.3
$40,000-$44,999
17.1
14.6
18.7
11.1
16.7
36.4
$45,000 or over
3.6
3.1
3.9
11.1
3.5
0.0

Chart 9: Salary Ranges


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Section IV

Summary Of Findings

The following summary is organized to reflect the contextual relevancy of the findings to NC State's recently adopted strategic plan. Therefore, goals of that plan to which findings of the survey are relevant appear as headers to the findings in various areas.

Strategic Plan Goal #1: NC State will improve success and satisfaction of undergraduate and graduate students, staff, and faculty.

Plans After Graduation

As of March 1996, close to one half (44.8%) of respondents reported they were set after graduation in either employment or graduate school. The great majority of respondents who reported having accepted a position were able to find full-time work, and in most cases reported a close connection between the major in which they graduated and their employment following graduation.

Employment/Internships while at NC State

More than three-fourths (77.1%) of all respondents indicated that they had worked during the academic year at NC State.

Student Satisfaction with Academic Experiences

Respondents reported differential rates of satisfaction with many aspects of their academic experiences at NC State.

Student Satisfaction with Activities and Services

As part of the survey, respondents rated their satisfaction with the quality of NC State student services and campus related activities. At least two thirds of all graduating seniors reported at least moderate satisfaction with all services and activities, with the exception of financial aid services and food service on campus.

Student Ratings of Staff Responsiveness

Respondents rated the responsiveness of staff in fifteen university offices or units. At least two thirds of all graduating seniors reported staff in these areas were at least moderately responsive, with the exception of financial aid and food service staff.


Time to Degree Completion

Most respondents reported entering NC State as freshmen, more than half of all respondents (58.7%) indicated that they were able to obtain their degree in 8 semesters, and 87.9% reported taking fewer than 15 credit hours during at least one semester at NC State (significantly more males than females).

Student Goal Achievement

Outcomes of General Education

Respondents reported positive experiences at NC State in terms of growth needs being met and courses helping them gain an appreciation of and make friends with students from different cultures. Seniors felt that NC State contributed highly to their collegiate experience in areas of technical skills development, while lower levels of contribution were perceived in development of attitudes and values.

Student Personal Development

Most respondents reported high or very high current developmental levels on personal characteristics, but reported a relatively lower rating for the educational contribution through the NC State experience to their current developmental level on personal characteristics. There were significant differences found by gender for both current level and educational contribution.

Environment for Learning

A number of respondents commented on the aesthetic quality of the NC State campus, the cleanliness and upkeep of campus buildings, and the quality and currentness of facilities.

Personal Safety

Relatively high ratings were indicated by respondents for personal safety on campus; even so, numerous comments were received on this issue, especially from female respondents.

Choice of Major

A prevalent theme in open-ended comments were the requests that students be given more time before having to choose a major and that more information on the majors available should be disseminated.

Strategic Plan Goal #6: NC State will expand multicultural and global awareness among the members of the university community, in its curricula, and through international partnerships.

Strategic Plan Goal #7: NC State will achieve a diverse student body, faculty and staff that better reflect contemporary society.

Campus Climate

The campus climate was generally seen as being supportive towards diverse subgroups of students, but significant differences were observed by gender in the perception of campus climate for men and disabled students and by ethnicity in perception of campus climate for African-Americans, men, other ethnic minorities, and international students. Climate issues concerning the atmosphere, course perspectives, faculty issues, and extracurricular activities were also assessed. See the section on Campus Diversity Issues for additional discussion.

Campus Diversity Issues

Significant differences in response were found by race and gender in a number of areas. Following is a discussion of the most prominent.


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Section V

Comparison of 1995 and 1996 Findings

This section of the report offers a comparison of 1995 and 1996 responses on select questions from the Graduating Senior Survey. A summary of demographic information on the two response classes can be found in Table 1, followed by a comparison by academic unit in Table 2. An in-depth analysis of how the two groups differ or agree on various experiences within the university is provided in the remainder of this section.

Tests of significance between the two groups on identical survey questions were performed using Chi-square analysis for questions with strictly categorized responses and t-tests for questions with numerically-coded responses. These tests were conducted on responses from the full sample size for both 1995 (N=1,094) and 1996 (N=1,044).

SUMMARY

NC State graduating seniors in 1995 and 1996 responded very similarly to many questions asked in both years. Half of each class responded that their primary goal or objective for attending NC State was to obtain a bachelor's degree as preparation for a career, with three-fourths of respondents expecting to fully accomplish their goal. Seniors in each class rated themselves similarly on personal development and perceived NC State contribution to their technical skills development, development of attitudes and values, and goals for undergraduate education.

Satisfaction with the computer labs/center services, opportunities for participation in co-curricular activities, and personal safety on campus increased significantly in 1996. The 1996 cohort indicated that the NC State campus was significantly less supportive of African-Americans than the 1995 respondents reported.

Over one-third of seniors in each class worked 21 hours a week or more while at NC State, with more than half stating this employment was at least somewhat related to their degree. As of the time of the surveys, fewer 1996 than 1995 seniors had secured employment after graduation. Of those who had already found jobs, most respondents in both classes indicated they would be employed in full-time, permanent jobs directly related to their degree.

DEMOGRAPHIC COMPARISON

In order to offer a comparison of the two survey groups' reported experiences at NC State, an analysis of how the two cohorts differ demographically is presented first. Table 1 shows that there are no significant differences in gender between the 1995 and 1996 senior respondents. However, there are significant differences by ethnicity (p < 0.01) and academic unit (p < 0.001) of the two groups, as displayed in Table 1 and Table 2, respectively.

Table 1: Gender and Ethnicity of Respondents
1995
1996
Ethnic Group
Female
Male
Total
Female
Male
Total
African-American
30
2.7%
14
1.3%
44
4.0%
42
4.0%
20
1.9%
62
5.9%

Other Ethnic Minorities
19
1.7%
43
3.9%
62
5.6%
11
1.1%
24
2.3%
35
3.4%

White
403
36.9%
584
53.4%
987
90.3%
380
36.6%
562
54.1%
942
90.7%

Total
452
41.4%
641
58.6%
1,093
100.0%
433
41.9%
606
58.1%
1,039
100.0%
Ethnicity: p < 0.01; Note: Numbers in Table 1 differ slightly from the overall sample size because of missing data on gender and ethnicity.

Table 2: Academic Unit of Respondents
1995
1996
Agriculture and Life Sciences
178
16.3%
213
20.4%
Design
37
3.4%
47
4.5%
Education and Psychology
62
5.7%
68
6.5%
Engineering
407
37.2%
307
29.4%
Forest Resources
65
5.9%
66
6.3%
Humanities and Social Sciences
153
14.0%
146
14.0%
Management
104
9.5%
78
7.5%
Physical and Mathematical Sciences
48

4.4%

60

5.7%
Textiles
40
3.7%
59
5.7%
Total
1,094
100.0%
1,044
100.0%
p < 0.001

STUDENT GOAL ACHIEVEMENT

Respondents from 1995 and 1996 reported significantly different (p < .01) primary goals or objectives for attending NC State (see Table 3). In general, most 1995 seniors indicated a desire to obtain a bachelor's degree as preparation for a career (55.2%) or as preparation for graduate or professional school (28.0%). 1996 seniors were less likely to have the goal of obtaining a degree as preparation for a career (49.4%) than the 1995 seniors, yet slightly more apt to want to pursue a bachelor's degree or certificate for its value only (18.2%) or as preparation for further education (29.9%).

Table 4 shows that 1995 and 1996 seniors agree on the extent to which they will have accomplished their primary goal. Although 1996 responses show a small shift from 1995 responses - an increase in the percentage who said they would partially accomplish their goal, and a decrease in the percentage who estimate that they would fully accomplish their goal, none of these differences are statistically significant. NC State seniors in the survey (77.7% in 1995 and 74.2% in 1996) markedly believe that they will fully achieve their primary goal or objective.

Table 3: Primary Goal/Objective for Attending NC State
Primary goal or objective for attending NC State (%)
1995

1996

% Change
Bachelor's degree or certificate only
13.6

18.2

+4.6
Bachelor's degree as preparation for school
28.0

29.9

+1.9
Bachelor's degree as preparation for career
55.2

49.4

-5.8
Improve knowledge, skills, competencies required for job
2.6

1.4

-1.2
Courses for personal interest
0.1
0.2
+0.1
Other
0.6
0.9
+0.3
p < 0.01

Table 4: Accomplished Primary Goal/Objective
Extent will have accomplished primary goal (%)
1995

1996
Fully accomplished
77.7
74.2
Partially accomplished
21.8
25.2
Not accomplished
0.6
0.6

Likewise, Tables 5 and 6 demonstrate that 1995 and 1996 seniors reflect favorably on their education at NC State. If given the ability to make choices based on experience, 88.0% and 87.7% (in 1995 and 1996, respectively) responded that they would choose to attend NC State again. Similarly, 78.4% of 1995 respondents and 78.3% of 1996 respondents stated that they would choose the same major field of study again.

Table 5: Attend NC State Again
Choose to attend NC State again (%)
1995

1996
Yes
88.0
87.7
No
12.0
12.3

Table 6: Choose Same Major Again
Choose same major field of study again (%)
1995

1996
Yes
78.4
78.3
No
21.6
21.7

CAMPUS CLIMATE

Table 7 shows the percentages of respondents who believe that particular groups (women, men, African-Americans, other ethnic minorities, international students, disabled students, and gay and lesbian students) received at least mild to strong support on campus. This perception of campus climate remained virtually the same from 1995 to 1996 for all groups rated except African-Americans. The 1996 cohort indicated that the NC State campus was significantly (p < 0.01) less supportive of African-Americans than 1995 respondents indicated. The perceived campus climate for African-Americans as mildly to strongly supportive fell from 70.8% in 1995 to 66.0% in 1996.

Table 7: Campus Climate
Campus climate (% mild to strong support)
1995
1996
% Change
Women
76.2
72.9
-3.3
Men
72.6
69.9
-2.7
African-Americans
70.8
66.0
-4.8 *
Other ethnic minorities
58.4
55.2
-3.2
International students
61.6
60.6
-1.0
Disabled students
55.9
53.6
-2.3
Gay and lesbian students
26.2
27.7
+1.5
*p < 0.01

STUDENT PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

When survey respondents were asked to judge their current levels of development of six personal characteristics, 1995 seniors and 1996 seniors rated themselves on similar levels for all characteristics. 90.7% of both the 1995 and 1996 cohort reported their current level of development as very high or high for independence and self-reliance (see Table 8).

The two classes also mirrored one another in terms of their perception of NC State's contribution to their development of these personal characteristics. Table 9 shows that 69.9% of the 1995 seniors and 72.4% of the 1996 seniors acknowledged that NC State contributed very greatly or greatly to their development of potential for success.

Table 8: Current Level of Personal Characteristics
Current level of personal characteristics (% high to very high)
1995

1996

% Change
Self-confidence
77.1
75.4
-1.7
Sense of personal identity
86.7
82.6
-4.1
Independence and self-reliance
90.7
90.7
0.0
Potential for success
89.0
88.5
-0.5
Coping with change
78.2
74.9
-3.3
Ability to handle stress
70.3
69.8
-0.5

Table 9: Extent of NC State Contribution to Personal Characteristics
Extent of NC State contribution to personal characteristics (% very greatly to greatly)
1995

1996

% Change
Self-confidence
50.0
51.2
+1.2
Sense of personal identity
46.8
48.7
+1.9
Independence and self-reliance
60.7
63.2
+2.5
Potential for success
69.9
72.4
+2.5
Coping with change
53.7
52.9
-0.8
Ability to handle stress
56.9
56.7
-0.2

STUDENT SATISFACTION

1995 and 1996 respondents generally displayed similar levels of satisfaction with academic services at NC State. The only significant difference occurred on the rating of computer labs. Nearly 85% of 1996 respondents indicated that they were at least moderately satisfied with computer labs at NC State, an increase of roughly 6 percentage points from 78.8% satisfaction among 1995 seniors (see Table 10). Satisfaction with instruction in major, instruction overall, and diversity of courses remained extremely high among both classes.

Table 10: Satisfaction With the Quality of NC State Academic Areas
Satisfaction with the quality of NC State academic areas (% moderately to very satisfied)

1995


1996


% Change
Instruction in major
94.3
94.0
-0.3
Overall instruction
94.1
93.6
-0.5
Diversity of courses in major
86.6
85.1
-1.5
Diversity of courses overall
90.1
91.6
+1.5
Availability of courses in major
79.3
83.5
+4.2
Availability of courses overall
87.1
88.3
+1.2
Adequacy of classroom facilities
79.5
78.9
-0.6
Adequacy of laboratory facilities
74.5
78.5
+4.0
Academic advising
68.0
68.3
+0.3
Opportunity for interaction with faculty
77.7
78.5
+0.8
Academic support services
82.3
86.6
+4.3
Library services
80.0
85.1
+5.1
Computer lab/center services
78.8
84.7
+5.9 *
Internships, co-ops, etc.
83.7
84.7
+1.0
*p < 0.01

In terms of satisfaction with the quality of student services, significantly more 1996 respondents (p < .01) were at least moderately satisfied with co-curricular activities (such as concerts, guest speakers, and volunteer work) and personal safety on campus (see Table 11). The percentage of students who were at least moderately satisfied with opportunity to participate in co-curricular activities increased 6.8% from 1995 to 1996 and the percentage of students who were at least moderately satisfied with personal safety markedly increased 11.4% from 1995 to 1996.

Table 11: Satisfaction With the Quality of NC State Student Services
Satisfaction with the quality of NC State student services (% moderately to very satisfied)
1995

1996

% Change
Opportunity to participate in co-curricular activities
84.3

91.1

+6.8 *
Opportunity to join campus clubs
93.7
93.6
-0.1
Services for commuter students
66.4
69.3
+2.9
Personal safety on campus
72.8
84.2
+11.4 *
Career services/employment
68.7
76.4
+7.7
Financial aid services
60.8
64.4
+3.6
Bookstore services and products
77.2
77.1
-0.1
Registration process
88.5
85.3
-3.2
Residence halls
71.8
72.5
+0.7
Food service on campus
56.9
55.6
-1.3
Campus-sponsored recreation
89.4
87.1
-2.3
Health services
81.3
81.6
+0.3
Business office/cashier
82.3
83.2
+0.9
Counseling center
80.0
81.2
+1.2
Chaplains' Cooperative Ministry
N/A
86.5
N/A
Registration and Records
87.6
88.0
+0.4
*p < 0.01

OUTCOMES OF GENERAL EDUCATION

1995 and 1996 survey respondents offered a comparable estimation of how well NC State contributed to the development of technical skills and attitudes and values. Table 12 shows that most students (94.6% in 1995 and 93.0% in 1996) believed that NC State had its greatest impact on their technical skills development by contributing at least somewhat to enhancing analytic skills. In terms of perceived NC State contribution to development of attitudes and values, the contribution to development of attitudes and values was rated lower than contribution to technical skills development. Data in Table 13 reveal that seniors feel their NC State education contributed at least somewhat to developing a tolerance for divergent views (78.4% in 1995 and 78.3% in 1996). Another finding that should be noted is the decline in contribution to exercising public responsibility and community service, from 62.2% in 1995 to 54.1% in 1996.

Table 12: Contribution of NC State Education to Technical Skills Development
Contribution of NC State education to technical skills development (% moderately to very much)

1995


1996


% Change
Writing skills
85.1
84.8
-0.3
Speaking skills
85.1
84.2
-0.9
Comprehension skills
88.4
88.1
-0.3
Using mathematics skills
86.8
84.0
-2.8
Applying scientific methods of inquiry
88.8
87.8
-1.0
Enhancing analytic skills
94.6
93.0
-1.6
Developing computer skills
84.9
87.2
+2.3

Table 13: Contribution of NC State Education to Attitudes and Values
Contribution of NC State education to attitudes and values (% moderately to very much)
1995

1996

% Change
Developing a tolerance for divergent views
78.4
78.3
-0.1
Understanding diverse cultures and values
69.5
70.7
+1.2
Recognizing and acting upon ethical principles
72.4
72.5
+0.1
Exercising public responsibility and community service
62.2

54.1

-8.1
Appreciating racial and sexual equality
64.6
62.0
-2.6
Advancing your appreciation of the arts
49.8
49.3
-0.5
Understanding issues and problems facing the world
68.1

69.0

+0.9

In terms of how well NC State meets established goals for undergraduate education, 1995 and 1996 respondents gave similar ratings. The largest approval by both 1995 and 1996 seniors was NC State's contribution to development of students' ability to plan and carry out projects independently, followed closely by contribution to development of students' ability to critically analyze ideas and information (see Table 14).

Table 14: Contribution of NC State Education to Established Goals for Undergraduate Education
Contribution of NC State education to established goals for undergraduate education (% moderately to very much)

1995


1996


% Change
Understanding the present as relates to history
64.9
67.9
+3.0
Understanding how science and technology influence life
87.3

88.2

+0.9
Ability to critically analyze ideas and information
93.0
94.3
+1.3
Ability to work with diverse backgrounds
84.4
83.7
-0.7
Ability to lead or guide others
84.1
85.6
+1.5
Ability to function as part of a team
91.8
90.4
-1.4
Ability to plan and carry out projects independently
93.4

94.4

+1.0
Appreciating learning as a lifelong process
87.7
89.1
+1.4
Commitment to personal health and fitness
70.9
69.7
-1.2

In comparing 1995 and 1996 results on literacy measures, Table 15 shows that both classes reported some interest in current events. 71.7% of the 1995 cohort and 70.9% of the 1996 cohort responded that they read newspapers or news magazines at least one time per week, while at least half of those students in both cohorts reported that they read newspapers or news magazines more than three times per week. Likewise, data in Table 16 gives evidence that 44.3% of respondents in both survey years reported that they read for leisure at least one time per week.

Table 15: How Often Read the News
On average, how often do you read newspapers and news magazines? (%)
1995

1996

% Change
More than 3 times per week
35.0
36.5
+1.5
1-3 times per week
36.7
34.4
-2.3
1-3 times per month
16.5
15.7
-0.8
Less than 1 time per month
3.9
2.9
-1.0
Seldom
6.1
9.4
+3.3
Not at all
1.9
1.1
-0.8

Table 16: How Often Read for Leisure
On average, how often do you read for leisure?(%)
1995

1996

% Change
More than 3 times per week
21.6
21.4
-0.2
1-3 times per week
22.7
22.9
+0.2
1-3 times per month
19.8
22.7
+2.9
Less than 1 time per month
14.7
10.1
-4.6
Seldom
17.0
19.3
+2.3
Not at all
4.2
3.6
-0.6

TIME TO DEGREE COMPLETION

The percentage of 1995 and 1996 seniors who reported taking more than eight semesters to graduate is displayed in Table 17. A little less than half of the survey respondents each year, 43.6% in 1995 and 41.3% in 1996, took more than eight semesters to complete their studies at NC State.

Respondents who reported that they took more than eight semesters to graduate also gave a primary reason for why they needed this extended time period to finish their studies. Table 18 presents those primary reasons. Seniors in both classes reported that they took more than eight semesters to graduate predominantly because of changing majors, taking on a double major or second major, having to work while enrolled in school, and participating in programs that included internships, practicum, student teaching, cooperative education, or international study.

Table 17: More than Eight Semesters to Graduate
More than eight semesters to graduate (%)
1995

1996
Yes
43.6
41.3
No/Missing
56.4
58.7

Table 18: Primary Reason for Taking More than Eight Semesters to Graduate
Primary reason for taking more than eight semesters to graduate (%)
1995

1996

% Change
Changed major
21.1
22.9
+1.8
Repeated courses to improve grades
5.4
8.3
+2.9
Could not meet GPA requirements for major
1.5
1.4
-0.1
Hours required in major above average
4.9
3.2
-1.7
Program included an internship, practicum, student teaching, cooperative education, and/or international study

14.1


10.0


-4.1
Courses needed were not always available
1.3
2.9
+1.6
Poor academic advising
3.3
3.7
+0.4
Lost credits from transfer institution
1.5
2.0
+0.5
Took fewer hours per semester to improve GPA
4.9

4.3

-0.6
Program took longer than 4 years to complete
5.1
4.6
-0.5
Academic suspension
0.3
0.6
+0.3
Double major/second major/co-major
14.1
11.2
-2.9
Other academic reasons
N/A
4.3
N/A
Had to work while enrolled in school
13.1
12.9
-0.2
Stopped out completely to earn money
1.5
2.0
+0.5
Family responsibilities
1.0
1.1
+0.1
Unable to handle heavier academic load
2.6
1.4
-1.2
Other personal reasons
4.1
3.2
-0.9

EMPLOYMENT AND INTERNSHIPS AT NC STATE

The 1995 cohort and the 1996 cohort responded almost identically in terms of employment while enrolled at NC State, as presented in Table 19. A little more than a third of the respondents each year (37.0% in 1995 and 37.9% in 1996) worked 21 hours or more per week while attending NC State.

As for the relation between that employment and their major, there were no significant changes between 1995 and 1996 responses, as shown in Table 20. More than half of the seniors each year (57.0% in 1995 and 58.2% in 1996) reported that their school-year job was at least somewhat related to their major area of study.

Table 19: Average Hours Worked Per Week While at NC State
Average hours worked per week while at NC State (%)
1995

1996
21 or more hours/week
37.0
37.9
20 or less hours/week
63.1
62.1

Table 20: School-Year Job Related to Major
School-year job related to major (%)
1995

1996
Directly related
26.4
29.1
Somewhat related
30.6
29.1
Not related
43.0
41.8

Tables 21 and 22 provide information on cooperative education (co-op) participation and evaluations of that experience. Similar percentages of the students from both the 1995 (17.5%) and 1996 (16.3%) cohort reported participation in the co-op program. Of those who reported participation, more than half in both survey years also commented that their co-op experience proved beneficial in getting a job after graduation.

Table 21: Co-op Participation
Participation in co-op (%)
1995
1996
Yes
17.5
16.3
No
82.5
83.7

Table 22: Value of Co-op Experience
Co-op experience helped in getting employment (%)
1995

1996

% Change
Yes
57.5
52.5
-5.0
No
14.4
14.9
+0.5
Not sure
8.3
7.8
-0.5
Not applicable; no job yet
19.9
24.8
+4.9

PLANS AFTER GRADUATION

Table 23 displays the distribution of 1995 and 1996 respondents' plans after graduation. Predominantly, respondents in both years cited plans to enter or re-enter the work force after graduation, with students indicating various stages within that plan. The largest percentage of respondents were still seeking employment at the time of the survey (35.8% in 1995 and 38.3% in 1996). However, a decline occurred in the percentage of seniors who had already secured positions after graduation (as of the time of the survey), from 23.2% in 1995 to 17.7% in 1996. At least one-fifth of both cohorts, 20.5% in 1995 and 20.8% in 1996, listed plans to attend graduate or professional school either full-time or part-time.

Table 23: Plans Following Graduation
Plans following graduation (%)
1995
1996
% Change
Don't know yet
5.6
6.8
+1.2
Accepted position after graduation
23.2
17.7
-5.5
Continuing in current position
5.5
4.7
-0.8
Graduate/professional school full-time
18.6
18.5
-0.1
Graduate/professional school part-time and working part-time
1.9

2.3

+0.4
Still seeking employment
35.8
38.3
+2.5
Not seeking employment and not planning to attend school
2.7

3.8

+1.1
Entering military service
1.2
1.6
+0.4
Other
5.6
6.3
+0.7

For those seniors who had already accepted employment after graduation, Tables 24-27 demonstrate how that employment substantively relates to education, the status and nature of employment, and whether the earned degree is required for the position. The 1995 and 1996 seniors responded similarly on these post-graduation employment questions. Most respondents who had already accepted employment indicated that they would be employed in full-time, permanent positions, in which their job would be directly related to their degree.

Table 24: Relationship of Employment to Degree
Relationship of employment to degree (%)
1995

1996
Directly related
69.4
66.6
Somewhat related
17.7
25.1
Not related
12.9
8.4

Table 25: Employment Status After Graduation
Employment status after graduation (%)
1995

1996
Full-time
93.6
94.2
Part-time
6.4
5.8

Table 26: Nature of Employment
Nature of employment (%)
1995
1996
Permanent
86.2
79.6
Temporary
13.8
20.4

Table 27: Minimum Educational Requirements for Position
Minimum educational requirements for position (%)
1995

1996

% Change
Bachelor Degree
84.1
84.8
+0.7
Associate/two years of college
3.4
7.3
+3.9
Certificate/one year of college
1.6
0.7
-0.9
High School Diploma or less
11.0
7.3
-3.7

Table 28 offers a look at the range of salaries that graduates who have already secured positions will receive. 1995 and 1996 responses are fairly similar, with obvious percentage increases from 1995 to 1996 in the higher salary brackets. However, these reported differences between 1995 and 1996 respondents are not statistically significant.

Table 28: Salary Range
Salary range (%)
1995
1996
% Change
Under $20,000
15.8
13.5
-2.3
$20,000-$24,999
17.9
14.2
-3.7
$25,000-$29,999
12.0
15.7
+3.7
$30,000-$34,999
14.9
14.9
0.0
$35,000-$39,999
26.6
21.0
-5.6
$40,000-$44,999
10.3
17.1
+6.8
$45,000 or over
2.4
3.6
+1.2


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